103

Both phrases are idiomatic but they don't mean the same thing. The difference between "water bottles" and "bottles of water" is the water. Bottles of water have water in them. Water bottles can be empty. An empty water bottle is not a bottle of water, though it might be a bottle of air.


89

It's wrong. This is deliberate on the part of the game designers. Peons are not known for being highly educated or well-spoken. However, babies sometimes speak this way before they learn the difference between objective pronouns (me) and subjective pronouns (I). For that reason, incorrect constructions like "me (verb)" or "me (adjective)" are associated ...


63

Presumably, you are talking about this cat: If not, that's OK. Hat on a cat describes a hat being atop a cat, as you say. Cat in the hat can mean what you describe, the cat being inside the hat (e.g. the cat being inside a much larger hat). However, there is a different usage of in here: in 9. preposition If you are dressed in a piece of clothing, ...


52

Concur and agree are synonyms, but "I couldn't agree more" is a set phrase. While they technically mean the same thing, replacing agree with concur in that phrase sounds a little peculiar. Concur is highly formal, commonly found in legislative or judicial settings. Agree is a more frequent and common word. "I couldn't agree more" is somewhat colloquial, so ...


51

Both usages are acceptable to describe the room you describe. Restroom is probably used more often due to the environment where those larger, several stalls, several sinks, bathrooms exist. Restroom is the more formal word. Your first day of work you would be more likely to ask your boss where the restroom is. Bathroom is the more casual word. You might ...


47

"Let's hear it for..." is an idiomatic way of inviting the audience at a stage show or live television show recording to applaud for somebody. This is particularly common in television when cues for the audience are important for the recording process. The expression can also be used just to express appreciation for somebody or something - this latter usage ...


46

The distinction you describe does not exist. "Let go of" just means to stop holding something, regardless of what's moving away or if anything is moving at all. "Let go of the chair" is a perfectly normal thing to say.


44

Yes, it's fine in everyday life. For example, in this recent headline from Metro, the free London newspaper: Panic buyer screams at Tesco staff for refusing to let him buy 24 bottles of water https://metro.co.uk/2020/03/19/panic-buyer-screams-tesco-staff-refusing-let-buy-24-bottles-water-12424789/


44

I think you have misparsed this. It seems you treat "worry" as a noun and an object of stroke "to stroke his whiskers" and "to stroke his worry". That's not correct. "Worry" is a verb, and so there is a list of two actions: "to stroke his whiskers" and "to worry". Worry is being used as a quotative verb like "say" or "ask". It introduces the direct speech....


38

"Senior member" is the better choice, unless you're deliberately using it in a joking way. Although it's technically true that the user's account is older than yours, "elder" is generally used in a more narrow sense to describe someone's actual, real-life age, while "senior" is much more commonly used in this context and doesn't ...


36

No, she is intentionally "crossing her eyes" or "looking cross-eyed". The boy is rolling his eyes upward.


36

Agree and concur are synonyms, but the English usage of them corresponds to their etymology. "Concur" derives from Latin concurrere, which literally means "to run (currere) together with (con) something or someone", and was also used for people gathering together in a crowd. "Agree" derives from Latin "ad gratus" meaning "to be pleasing to (someone)". "...


35

"Lingua" is not an English word. To my knowledge it is only found (in English) in the expression lingua franca which comes from Italian and refers to a "common language" between two or more groups of people. It is a loan word. When referring to the anatomical thing, we always say "tongue" and never "lingua." "Lingua" itself is Latin, and this root is the ...


35

No, it does not quite get the meaning you want. "Under" could only be used with "water." The way you have your sentence means that there is a limitation of the word "under." That is, the only place you could use "under" would be with "water." That is, you are saying you can't use "under penalty of law" or "under duress" or "under budget." You might try ...


34

"Plague" can have several different meanings depending on context: In its most technical form, "plague" is used to refer specifically to diseases caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis (e.g. "bubonic plague", "pneumonic plague", etc). This has historically also been known by names such as "the black death", etc. In this sense, COVID-19 is definitely not ...


31

You can see the same structure used with all sorts of English phrases, e.g. Bottle of beer vs beer bottle Soda can vs can of soda Packet of crisps vs crisp packet Paint tin vs tin of paint If you say "water bottle" you're using "water" as an adjective to describe the type of bottle it is — a bottle (usually) used to store water. So that could be a branded ...


31

If you look at the graphic you attached to the question, you'll see the answer already provided. At a supermarket, where you've already paid, you get a receipt: [Merriam-Webster] 1 a : a writing acknowledging the receiving of goods or money It's only at a restaurant, for example, when you're given a statement of what you ate and how much you still owe,...


30

The word "dude" was originally a mocking term around 1890 in the US for a city man who wore overly fancy clothes. In the West, it became a term for city people who were out of place in a frontier environment. For example, a "dude ranch" still refers to a place where men from the city come for a vacation and pretend to be cowboys. Then, ...


30

proverbial = goes beyond its first meaning Merriam Webster: Definition of proverbial 1: of, relating to, or resembling a proverb 2: that has become a proverb or byword : commonly spoken of the proverbial smoking gun aka well-known or familiar, too. No, there is no specific "proverb" associated with the middle finger. However, the middle finger ...


30

Given that a young member could have been here for longer than an older person, or someone might have been here for a long time but not achieved many privileges, I suggest long-standing member. This has no implications of age, superiority or of anything else except purely the time they have been on the site.


28

I’m guessing you are referring to the usage as an interjection/exclamation when one is angry or annoyed. dude noun interjection 5 (an expression of shock, approval, sympathy, or other strong feeling): Dude! That's one expensive sandwich! (Dictionary.com) Notice that it can be used to express a variety of “strong feelings”. The usage in the entry seems to ...


28

This is something that can vary depending on where in the English-speaking world you are. There are also some words that are used very precisely within the beverage industry, but perhaps more broadly and imprecisely by the general public. Here are a few terms that apply to unflavored, unsweetened, carbonated water: Carbonated water is not really a special ...


25

Although this is more a matter of style than definition, the stylistic convention is that you always use hung unless you are describing a person (or I suppose animal) who has been killed by hanging—in which case it should be hanged. This is what Merriam-Webster says about it in "Is it 'Hung' or 'Hanged'?": The standard rule for the past tense of ...


24

Contrary to most answers here, I think there are mutiple meanings here. Doubts about Dumbledore had riddled him You could argue (as others have) that the doubts he had about Dumbledore were puzzling to Harry. However, unless Dumbledore actually set him some riddles/puzzles to solve, I think it really means that Harry is: Riddled with doubt This is a ...


23

The other answers do a fine job explaining how the you can use in to describe someone wearing clothing. However, there is another difference between the two alternatives you give that I would like to highlight. The phrase "cat in the hat" focuses on the cat (who is wearing a hat), while the phrase "the hat on the cat" focuses on the hat (which is being worn ...


23

The pairing of "basically literally" is very colloquial/informal and skews young. I hear it moderately frequently, mostly when people are recounting stories about personal interactions. It means "I am emphatic that my description conveys an accurate feeling of a moment/interaction, but it isn't literally true--I am exaggerating or simplifying for story ...


23

Imagine a man who was raised in the jungle by animals ever since he was a child. He was not taught English since animals don't speak English. He has only recently met his first human, and is currently being exposed to speaking English (or any civilised language, for that matter) Which statement would make more sense to come from him, in this context: "Me ...


22

It's not an exact opposite, but the mythical animal "unicorn" is sometimes used as a description for people and things that are so rare and special that they may seem nearly mythical. For instance, at my company, the most senior developers are jokingly referred to as "unicorns" because it's very rare for a developer to get promoted to that level --there are ...


22

It sounds much more correct to use "to", as saying "at", to me, sounds like you are "coming back" in terms of a "comeback", as though the door has insulted you, and now you're "going back at" it. It's as though you are attacking the door in some way. Also, I don't know what the context is, but I imagine that in the vast majority of cases you'd actually be ...


22

"Volume" doesn't mean the same as "audio" - it is the degree of loudness. An audio recording or video recording with audio may have different parts that are volumetrically louder or softer than other parts. AV equipment also allows the listener to adjust the volume so that they perceive the audio louder or quieter. When a recording has ...


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