New answers tagged

1

Neither "by its surface" or "by its side" mean what you show in the pictures. There are special words for the parts of cardboard, but they are not in general use. So most people would just say "rip up the cardboard" and allow the context to describe the actual process. You could say something like: You can't tear it in half, ...


0

You can "tear a sheet of paper / a piece of cardboard (in half)" or "tear it down the middle (lengthwise)." The words in parentheses are optional. There aren't very many different ways to tear cardboard, so it's not usually necessary to add more detail. You can also "tear off a piece" of something (paper or cardboard).


1

Any of these are valid constructions, but they mean different things. To swing would imply that the child is moving back and forth. To hang implies that they are just holding still. To dangle often implies that the thing is not very securely attached, or in a dangerous or temporary situation, so it's probably the least likely word one would use here. "...


0

Personally, I'd assume "elder member" was meant in the same context as "elder statesman" Collins: An experienced and respected member of an organization or profession is sometimes referred to as an elder statesman I certainly wouldn't take it as referring to somebody as elderly, or in any way offensively. That said, I can see how some ...


0

"Pulling" means to exert force on something in the direction of oneself. "Yanking" means to suddenly pull something, with a jerk. Although they are slightly different, it seems odd to use them together as you have, because you can only do one or the other. "Yanking at" would suggest repeatedly doing so, and this would suggest ...


0

I have to go. = I must go. = I am required to go. I don't want (to have to go) = I don't want (to be required to go). I don't want to be required to go, and I never wanted to be required to go. That may or may not mean that I don't want to go. It just means that I don't want it to be required. Does that help at all?


7

A person might be in their twenties but be a member of a Stack exchange site for as many as 8 years. In that case, elder or senior member sounds a bit of a misnomer. I prefer veteran user (a person who has had long experience in a particular field.) hi-rep user (only applicable if the user does indeed have >5K or if the site is large >10K in ...


0

Realistically, both elder and senior are going to bother someone, eventually, as ageism. Even "long-time" has that feel to it. I try to pick something that's inherently a compliment to them instead. I personally like more tongue in cheek descriptions like superior, ranking, eminent, ascendent, or tenured. Tenured Member is hard for an ...


28

Given that a young member could have been here for longer than an older person, or someone might have been here for a long time but not achieved many privileges, I suggest long-standing member. This has no implications of age, superiority or of anything else except purely the time they have been on the site.


6

(See Edit section at the bottom as well.) For your situation, senior member is correct and is much better than elder member. If senior is used like an adjective, in situations like this, it usually means that someone has been with the company/site longer, that they have a higher rank, or something else like that. This includes someone who has been using SE ...


0

You could also use 'renter' and 'property manager'.


39

"Senior member" is the better choice, unless you're deliberately using it in a joking way. Although it's technically true that the user's account is older than yours, "elder" is generally used in a more narrow sense to describe someone's actual, real-life age, while "senior" is much more commonly used in this context and doesn't ...


0

mind has another verb meaning: “regard as important; feel concern about.” This sense of being concerned about someone or something is used in expressions like “mind the baby”, “mind your manners”, “mind your elders”, or “mind the gap”. This is related to having someone or something “on your mind.” To not mind others could mean you she doesn’t consider them ...


1

I need to find new accommodation For the room, I need to pay monthly rent An alternative for the former, depending on country and age, might be digs. A rental car, property etc. is one you possess by means of paying rent (the manner of 'ownership' / residence).


1

How will we handle one-on-one instruction while social distancing? This sentence uses "social distance" as a verb, which is a neologism, a new usage. It is awkward, and probably best avoided. A more usual construction would be "while distancing socially". The phrases "social distance" and "social distancing" appear in ...


4

You are correct that "rent" normally refers to the payment and "rental" to the space that is rented. I need to find a new rental / rental unit / apartment to rent / place to rent / place to live. The (monthly) rent for the room is $300. A dialogue example: "I need to find a new place to rent. How much is the rent for your room/...


1

In casual conversation, you can safely use these two phrases interchangeably. It's a very small nuance, but I generally use "that's true" when someone presents new information or ideas I hadn't previously considered, and "that's right" when someone reminds me of something I previously knew. I'm not sure this is an official rule of ...


1

You can assuage a feeling, pain, or desire; you can soothe these things, and also soothe a person. You cannot assuage a person. Assuage Soothe


0

There's nothing wrong with the sentence. To mind is a little ambiguous between the multiple meanings it has, but the preceding sentence calls the girl in question laid-back. That would fall in line with the first definition more than the second - in other words, the girl in question doesn't allow herself to be bothered or upset by the presence of other ...


0

"While" as a conjunction is used to join two clauses separated by a comma, not two sentences. So your example should instead be written: On the "Definition of in school" page of Merriam-Webster, the US tag is used, while the "Definition of at school" page uses the British tag. Some more examples: One difference is that ...


1

First example: Tom is very extroverted and confident while Katy's shy and quiet. This example is clear and natural. However, if your intended meaning of "while" is equivalent to another conjunction like "but" or "yet", I think it is clearer to use the alternative conjunction, since "while" also has a temporal ...


1

I wouldn't describe it as either an imaginary or virtual person. Given that Rachel is an adult, that would give the impression that you think she’s a bit off mentally. All she's doing here in this scene is practicing what she's going to say when the guy she's interested in shows up. It's a very common trope in sitcoms and dramas; it's a way of letting the ...


0

It is up to you and depends a little on the purpose of the email. If it is about a relatively formal matter I'd use Mr. Parker. Dear Mr Parker, I regret that I will not be completing this course as I have decided to focus my language studies on Dutch instead of English. On the other hand if the matter relatively casual: Dear Joe, Here's the homework you ...


-1

We may call it an electric Socket Extension.


0

“Includes” actually works much better. “Contains” almost makes it seem as if they are saying combat sports are a mixture of the different specific disciplines it mentions. “Includes” is more clearly showing that “combat sports” is a category and that boxing, wrestling, kick boxing, etc. are examples of sports in that category.


0

Basically what BTC said. The wiki page is redundant. If you have already prefaced the subject you are talking about you not need reiterate the topic you’re talking about. However, this will always vary based on a number of variables that are too exhausting to list.


1

Your example, These include games such as football, cricket ... would be mildly redundant if the subject was clearly games. But it might not be if the subject was something related but not precisely games. For example, suppose, the subject was Sports, e.g. Sports are physical activities involving known rules and usually competition. These would include ...


0

"It can be said" can also be phrased "we can say". Searching the internet for either of these expressions leads to the same list of synonyms from powerthesaurus.org : it can be said you could say you might say you can say it could be said it may be said arguably we could say it can be stated it can be argued Luckily, one of the items is ...


0

googled his subject a few times over several days versus do a bit of googling to find some information he needed = that's like: do a bit of swimming if you use google as an active verb, it requires a direct object. They don't these sentences necessarily mean the same thing at all. I did a bit of cooking today. I cooked my favorite dish today. Are those ...


0

No. "The author googled a few times" sounds both incomplete and slightly incorrect to my ear. You Google [something specific], and it doesn't make sense to do it multiple times. But to "do a bit of Googling" implies that you're going through the process with a few different search terms, or clicking through several results to gather ...


0

"Googling" refers to the act of using Google and does not reference discrete searches. "Google" to refer to discrete searches is unnecessarily unweildy unless you're saying "I googled [search term]".


0

There is nothing wrong with your sentence. It is clear and natural. I am genuinely surprised at how few hits it returns. Of course, it now returns 4 hits, because thanks to your question, this page comes up! But your example is very specific. The more specific your sentence, the fewer results it will return. "I have everything for" returns 2,280,...


1

"rub off the skin" seems fine to me. "Skin" is a reasonable word to use for that: Don't you eat the skins? No, I rub it off with my fingers Whoops, it shot out my fingers; they're a bit slippery. There are lots of ways to express this: you could use the verb "skin the peanuts (by rubbing)". If you are writing a thesis on ...


0

Yes, "upstairs" is often used to describe a floor above the one you have previously mentioned, even in buildings with many floors. I can't find fault with your example, yet it doesn't feel quite right because you state right at the beginning that the people are on the third floor. As you must have already stated that the gunfire is occurring on the ...


1

"Get to" something means "reach that place or stage" in a process or journey. It can be used literally: We will get to Berlin on Tuesday and Moscow on Friday. Or as in the example: [I've reached the stage where I can draw two circles]. I will get to [the stage of drawing 100 circles] in a future video. You can use "going to" ...


0

In the UK context, the law requires you to go to school until you are 16. Moreover the government will pay your education until you are 19. Typically less academic students leave school at 16 (and enter into various forms of training) More academic students continue school until they are 18. The extra year to age 19 is only if you need to retake a year for ...


1

Borrowed from internet sites after googling: Parts of the peanut Parts of the peanut include: Shell - outer covering, in contact with dirt. Cotyledons (two) - main edible part. Seed coat - brown paper-like covering of the edible part. Radicle - embryonic root at the bottom of the cotyledon, which can be snapped off. Plumule - embryonic shoot emerging from ...


0

For some of these words, it helps if you think about what the words actually mean. A margin is the edge of something- for example, the margins on a printed document are the whitespace around the actual text. So something that is marginal means a) that it's quite a small amount compared to the whole, and/or b) that it's outside the main area of interest. The ...


1

Young and uneducated are adjectives, but you need nouns or noun phrases in both those locations. You can say Leaving school at a young age implies an incomplete education.


1

Normally, secondary education ends at the age of eighteen, when the twelfth grade is completed. Sometimes gifted students can graduate early, but the idiom "left school" generally means "without completing the course of studies." (And no college.) Now, sixteen is tenth grade, so he did receive a far amount of education. It implies a ...


3

"He had a satisfiable urge for ice cream.", indicating that he wanted ice cream and would be able to get some. "The ice cream he had was satisfactory.", indicating that the ice cream he ate pleased him in the way that he expected. The words, except for them both having "satisfaction" as a root, aren't very close in meaning.


0

In short, yes. It would (in my opinion) be more natural to say has to do with rather than related to. Having said that both are correct but related to is a slightly more formal way of saying it.


3

"Rules" in grammar refer to two different things. One is a way of describing the patterns in language. The second is a way of instructing people in how they should speak. The two things often match up, but not always. As with many abstract notions, whether something is one rule (with two parts) or two related rules is not defined, and doesn't ...


0

Yes it does. You must wear a hat for gardening means that you must wear a hat when you work in a garden. You must wear a hat to gardening is an unusual way of putting things but presumably means that you must wear a hat when you got to gardening functions/classes/events It's a bit like saying: You must take your gloves to boxing, referring to boxing ...


0

"round shape" -refers to something which is circular form in nature. while "rounded shape" -represents to a thing which can be characterize in different forms but was intendedly designed and curved as a spherical object at some point. Like a rounded shape Satellite Dish, that attached in a property to serve as an Antenna.


0

It conveys to something that "comes together" (e.g. -strength that lies within.) Also represents to something that "standing in between" and not exceeding - Like a time duration, or being part of two or more or subjects (e.g. -within the allotted time. / -within those lines.)


2

As you have pointed out, it's usually worded "I love myself" instead of "I love me". In fact, almost always. You ought to use the reflexive in such a case. However, this is not a mistake. Quite the contrary. It's a humorous situation, somewhat in the same spirit as referring to oneself "in the third-person". "because ...


0

The sentence "I won't be there until September" is perfectly all right. It implies that she is coming in September, but will not be there until then. I am only familiar with "up till", not the word uptil, myself (American English). "Up till" is a shortened form of "up until", and its meaning is entirely different from &...


0

As pointed out in the comments, your sentences are run-on and not grammatical. They could be corrected by inserting the conjunction "though", like this: I've passed the exam, though, granted, it was not easy. But, here is a better illustration of the use of the expressions. They are all concessive in this sense: American Heritage Dictionary "...


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