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-1 votes

Is it correct to say "that is a backward seven" or "that seven is backward""?

is it "upside down" or "backward"?. . You cannot call your daughter's "7", upside down as it means legs up and head down (image). You can call it, "backward", ...
James Mathai's user avatar
1 vote

Do we use "rapport" for only transactional relationships (teacher/student; seller/buyer; doctor/patient...)?

Short answer: Yes. thefreedictionary.com defines "rapport" as "Relationship, especially one of mutual trust or emotional affinity." That makes more sense for a relationship between ...
Jay's user avatar
  • 67.9k
1 vote

How to reply to "hope you all had a great time celebrating"

Don't overthink it. You could write a short text saying how much you enjoyed the birthday: I had a great time, thanks. We had cake and danced to old records.
James K's user avatar
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4 votes
Accepted

Does "I rushed to do homework" mean I quickly went to my homework and did it at any rate (maybe be fast or slow) or I did the homework quickly?

I don't think it's something very likely to be said. It could be ambiguous, but I would probably interpret it as your first, because for your second I would expect something like I rushed through my ...
Colin Fine's user avatar
  • 76.1k
0 votes

Is the idiom "the dog's bollocks" acceptable for printed media?

Asking if the phrase is acceptable for print is really no different to asking if it is acceptable to say it out loud - clearly some people do say it, but it is considered rude by some. It certainly is ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 106k
0 votes

Is the idiom "the dog's bollocks" acceptable for printed media?

Modern general-purpose dictionaries and other similar reference works don't censor their entries. For example, Collins has your exact idiom. (All bets are off for specialized reference works; I would ...
Laurel's user avatar
  • 15.7k
-1 votes

Do you say "We have company" even though that person was just a stranger to you?

In the scenario you describe, it would be odd to say, “We have company” because you were the only one there. To whom would you say it? The new arrival? Now that would be extremely odd. If instead of ...
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
1 vote

Do you say "We have company" even though that person was just a stranger to you?

In its most literal use, 'company' does tend to mean friendly visitors to your home, or that you have someone with you in another settings - someone you would call a companion. Saying "I/we have ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 106k
3 votes
Accepted

This usage of "would"

When you didn't come... is a neutral statement about the fact that you were absent. It says nothing about reasons. Maybe you stayed away because you hate me. But maybe you were on the way to my ...
Peter Kirkpatrick's user avatar
-1 votes

This usage of "would"

This is a stylistic choice made by the author/writer to add poetic flair to an emotion. A very direct and unemotional way to write it would be "when you didn't come..." but then the second ...
Tigerbeam's user avatar
0 votes

the alternative to the clause 'not just that S+V but that S+V'?

I'd say B & C sound odd because of the lack of consistency between the clauses. However, C sounds worse, since English tends to elide the second repeated element, like it does in comparatives or ...
cmw's user avatar
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4 votes
Accepted

Do you really distinguish the difference between "the shirt's rumpled" and "the shirt's wrinkled" and "the shirt's creased"?

You forgot crumpled! My take on it: I would call a garment wrinkled if it hadn't been ironed after being washed - full of small creases. I would call it creased if it had been placed between other ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
0 votes

"Life really is short"

Both are correct English utterances in terms of their syntax. So there's not really a difference in meaning but they'd be used in different circumstances. There are a lot of existing questions on ...
Nadeem Learning Center -Online's user avatar
2 votes

Do you really distinguish the difference between "the shirt's rumpled" and "the shirt's wrinkled" and "the shirt's creased"?

First, no, creases aren’t necessarily intentional. To call something creased often conveys that the thing bears a single crease. And creases are sharper, more pronounced than are wrinkles. Also, the ...
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
0 votes

Is it correct to say "he gave me a bookshelf" or "he gave me bookshelves"?

A bookshelf may have many shelves. Ref. Collins dictionary meaning, bookshelf in British English NOUN. a piece of furniture consisting of a shelf or shelves for books. collinsdictionary.com/...
James Mathai's user avatar
2 votes

Is it correct to say "he gave me a bookshelf" or "he gave me bookshelves"?

Bookshelves is ambiguous, but so would be bookshelf. The ambiguity can be avoided by referring to the thing your father gave you as a bookcase.
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

Is a expression "just like you don't " idiomatic?

I wouldn’t quite call it wrong, but it’s not idiomatic—in American English anyway. The awkwardness arises from an apparent inconsistency in its sense (polarity, direction, arithmetic sign). Just like ...
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
1 vote

Is a expression "just like you don't " idiomatic?

Yes. The words I have enclosed in square brackets are implied, and this is understood by native or fluent speakers: I don't know the exact meaning just like you don't [understand the exact meaning]. I ...
Michael Harvey's user avatar
0 votes

Degree or extent of something

So as an adverb:. OP's enquired about 'si' used as an adverb. Ref. Cambridge dictionary so + adjective (so difficult), so + adverb (so slowly). We often use so when we mean ‘to such a great extent’. ...
James Mathai's user avatar
0 votes

Can we say "she was sleepwalking" when she is not walking but sitting up?

"Parasomnia" is the broad term for sleep disorders that involve abnormal movements, behaviours, emotions, perceptions, and dreams. Sleepwalking, or 'somnambulism', to give it its medical ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 106k
0 votes

Can we say "she was sleepwalking" when she is not walking but sitting up?

"Sleep walking" - the term can also be used for doing other activities.. The term can also be used for doing other activities while deep in sleep, such as sitting up in bed, opening the ...
James Mathai's user avatar
-1 votes

Can we say "she was sleepwalking" when she is not walking but sitting up?

I'm afraid there's no convenient single word for this scenario and it would have to be spelled out. Sleepwalking has the distinct connotation of actually walking, even if the scenario you describe is ...
Andy Bonner's user avatar
  • 15.4k
1 vote

Is "a output" a typo or another type of pun?

It should be an output, but there's no mistake. An engine supplies power. You can also say that it puts out power. The power is then regarded as output. So you're saying that the engine supplies 420 ...
swmcdonnell's user avatar
  • 7,829
3 votes

Does it refer to the preceding noun or preparatory it?

There's some ambiguity in your sentence, because the highlighted 'it' could be read as either referring back to the bread you are speaking about or, as you suggest, acting as a 'preparatory it', ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 106k
0 votes

Shift a little forward? (I feel that it will be better to use "move over")

As always, it depends on the context, but shift is quite commonly used in place of move. I think shift implies moving something a small distance. It's like a minor move. For example, here the movement ...
swmcdonnell's user avatar
  • 7,829
3 votes

the more the person is likely to ~ vs. the more likely the person is to ~

Here's a relevant usage chart for the same construction, but comparing the more likely I am (OP's preferred version) and the more I am likely ("likely" moved to after subject+verb). As you ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

Is it correct to say "don't eat walking around" or "don't walk around eating"?

Clarity This is clearer: Don't walk around while you are eating. This is even clearer: Sit down and stay in one place while you are eating. It's usually clearer to ask for what you want than to ...
Ben Kovitz's user avatar
  • 27.6k
1 vote

Is it correct to say "don't eat walking around" or "don't walk around eating"?

Without while connecting your two clauses, your sentences sound like the following, where the two actions are integral to each other, not simply being done at the same time. The potential buyer ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 129k
1 vote
Accepted

"Death and morality" or "Death and immortality"

death and morality is not a meaningless combination in cultures whose religions are concerned with eschatology. death and mortality is pleonastic but that doesn't make it ungrammatical or impossible. ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 129k
1 vote
Accepted

Is it correct to say "the baby can walk 4 steps today" or "the baby can take 4 steps today"?

When reporting the ambulatory progress of a toddler it is idiomatic to say The baby took her first steps today. The baby took four steps today. The baby walked across the room today. "walked ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 129k
1 vote

"Death and morality" or "Death and immortality"

As Peter said in his answer, similarity in meanings of two nouns isn’t a requisite for connections of the nouns. On the use of ‘death’ and ‘morality’ together, there are some matches in Google Books ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
3 votes

can we say "the fan turned off by itself"?

We find lots of entries when we Google turned off by itself. This usage is hence quite common. This is true too when it comes to books. Google Books has lots of hits for turned off by itself. For ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
2 votes

"Death and morality" or "Death and immortality"

The comments suggest you have misquoted the Emily Dickinson article. But putting that aside, you are also wrong about the use of and. It does not have to connect "two items of equal value." ...
Peter Kirkpatrick's user avatar
0 votes

Use of "would" rather than "is"

Using "would be" The normal question format would be “Did Ronaldo wear this?” We use would to make hypotheses: when we imagine a situation: It would be difficult to get admission in that ...
James Mathai's user avatar
0 votes

Is the chart correct by using "recycling" and not "recycle"?

'Recycle' is only used as a noun for the process of recycling - it isn't used as a noun for the actual waste itself. So, as your graph scale refers to "waste" and not to the disposal process,...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 106k
0 votes

By the time and When

By the time vs when OP's two sentences are 1.By the time I arrived at the scene, the meeting had been over. 2.When I arrived at the scene, the meeting had been over. Are the two sentences correct? ...
James Mathai's user avatar
0 votes

Is it natural to say "Turn the bike so that you and it are side by side"?

Parallel and perpendicular parking. I understand from the diagram that OP is enquiring about Parallel and Perpendicular parking. Please find the attached diagram explaining these two parkings. In ...
James Mathai's user avatar
2 votes

Do we use "the + singular noun" to express that type of goods?

The When we use the definite article it does not mean that the thing spoken about is unique, ie that only one exists in the entire world. It only has to be unique within the context - your audience ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 106k
1 vote
Accepted

Do we use "the + singular noun" to express that type of goods?

Unless the context says otherwise, in general use like in the Mary example, that is used as described in Cambridge Dictionary: We use that most commonly to point to a thing or person. In a shop, ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
1 vote

Use of "Near no money"

A search in Google Books got me these three hits just from the first page: The Putter: Not A Sports Story Murder on a Small Island - Page viii Lost Youth Volume 2: London - Volume 2 - Page 226 The OP’...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
0 votes

Use 'Could not' and 'Nor' in the same sentence

Either-or , neither-nor usage I could not find at A nor B. Is this the right grammar? Can I use both 'could not' and 'nor' in the one sentence? First of all, what was it you couldn't find? Was it A ...
James Mathai's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Is it correct to say "glide my fingernail on the adhesive tape to feel its rim"?

tape and tape end. Often with various types of tape, we can't find the end. So: We run a fingernail (thumb or forefinger) around the roll of tape until we find edge or end of the tape. Then, we use ...
Lambie's user avatar
  • 46.8k
2 votes

Is it correct to say "glide my fingernail on the adhesive tape to feel its rim"?

"Glide" is possible but not the best word. "To glide" in this context means to move smoothly, gracefully, and effortlessly, without encountering any resistance. Merriam-Webster's ...
Stuart F's user avatar
  • 2,495
4 votes
Accepted

Is "conversational" used correctly in this context?

The person who wrote the text doesn't have great command of English. It's pretty obvious to me that what he was trying to convey was... ...[you should] do some research to at least become conversant ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
1 vote

the book was in the desk drawer

Guess was correct.. OP's two sentences are: a. I guessed the book was in the desk drawer. b. I guessed the book would be in the desk drawer. Neither sentences indicate that your guess was right or ...
James Mathai's user avatar
2 votes

'fight tooth and nail' - Can it be used for peaceful struggles?

"Fight tooth and nail" can be used metaphorically. A political campaign, a legal battle or a game of chess can all involve fighting "tooth and nail" if they are difficult and ...
DJClayworth's user avatar
  • 4,684
1 vote

When is it applied & said as "striped" or "striped?"

As a man from the southern United States, I can confirm it can be said, Strip-ed to describe something that has been decorated with stripes, specifically referring to the American flag as, the Strip-...
Ben Beard's user avatar
1 vote

What does "hairy business" mean?

hairy business is slang that can refer to a dangerous, risky, or daunting job. Collins defines hairy as "exciting, worrying, and somewhat frightening" and "business" has among its ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 129k
0 votes

How to resolve ambiguous meanings. Especially, "stand" and "stand up". And, are there alternatives?

In some countries, stand also refers to a place for a transport to park at. Like bus stand and sometimes, stand is used for planes as well as to where they park.
Megas's user avatar
  • 305
1 vote

What is the difference between "the worst" and "the most extreme"?

I think it is incorrect to say "the worst suffering" would likely generate a negative response but "the most extreme suffering" would not. Both phrases mean pretty much the same ...
Jay's user avatar
  • 67.9k

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