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Why do people keep saying that "rate" is the number of something that happens over a period of time?

I don't know why people say that because it's not true. Rates don't need to involve time. The term "rate" is typically used to describe the number of occurrences of an event or phenomenon ...
Astralbee's user avatar
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0 votes

Why do people keep saying that "rate" is the number of something that happens over a period of time?

I don't think it has to be something that happens. Instead, I would say that rate reflects an amount that varies based on what it is describing. For example: unemployment rate - amount of unemployment ...
swmcdonnell's user avatar
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0 votes

the ratio of them, their ratio, or the ratio thereof

You're using mathematical terms incorrectly. A ratio is a comparison of two quantities by division. The first number in a ratio is referred to as the "antecedent" (or "first term"),...
Astralbee's user avatar
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0 votes

Is using "the rate/ratio/proportion of people" correct when it's per X population?

Your question is are these correct: The number of these workers per 1000 people/population Yes, provided you make it clear what the 'population' is. 'Per 1000 population' is a way of normalising ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 102k
0 votes

Are they going to put/hold off the wedding till May?

They both mean to delay something in this context. However, "put off" suggests something has caused the delay while "hold off" usually means that a required condition has not been ...
Astralbee's user avatar
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0 votes
Accepted

Does replacing 'but' with 'and' change the meaning?

And is not necessary; so do is enough to indicate that verbs, adjectives and adverbs also precede their complements. The reason for including but is to remind the reader that 'preceding their ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
0 votes

the ratio of them, their ratio, or the ratio thereof

There is a lot to address here, but I'll try and keep it short. To answer your question first, I'd say the best answer was not among the options you listed. If your writing previously addressed what ...
fatalerrer's user avatar
0 votes
Accepted

Is 'were' used with 'ever' to express the impossibility of 'all the time' in if-clauses?

The phrase were ever in conditional clauses headed by if is typically used with conditions being presented as unlikely but not impossible. The shift from simple "need" or "ever need&...
TimR's user avatar
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1 vote
Accepted

Does this sentence "My friend got a call from me to ask her to go camping" make sense?

Your thoughts are more or less correct here. The first one is natural and expected. The second is possible, and would certainly have the same meaning, but it's a subtly odd collocation. "Giving a ...
Luke Sawczak's user avatar
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-1 votes

Does "something" in "say something to someone's face" refer to negative or bad things?

It can be what you like in context. POSITIVE John: "What, you said she was pretty??" Mario: "Yes, I said it to her face". NEGATIVE John: "What, you told him to his face that ...
Lambie's user avatar
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1 vote

Does "something" in "say something to someone's face" refer to negative or bad things?

Saying something to one's face definitely has a stronger connotation than just "directly" - it implies speaking frankly, usually pretty brashly. It's true that you'd usually say negative ...
Maciej Stachowski's user avatar
2 votes

Does "something" in "say something to someone's face" refer to negative or bad things?

If you have something to say about me, you should say it to my face. In the dramatic real-world contexts in which that statement is used, "something" means "a critical comment", ...
TimR's user avatar
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0 votes

Does "feasible" mean possible to do or possible to do easily or conveniently?

Some dictionaries give a definition of 'easily able to be carried out'; others just give, in effect, 'able to be carried out' with no implication of ease or practicality. If you want to be clear in ...
Michael Harvey's user avatar
1 vote

Is it correct to say "go to his home" so we don't worry if he is living in a flat or a house?

The place where you live is your home, no matter whether it is a house, a flat, a boat or a caravan!
Kate Bunting's user avatar
2 votes

Is it correct to say "tell your grandma that you had your hair washed today already so you don't have to do it tomorrow"?

Don't suppose that there is one and only one way to express yourself. Don't forget that "grandma" is (presumably) a native speaker of English and is quite capable of asking questions. Your ...
James K's user avatar
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1 vote

Is it correct to say "go to his home" so we don't worry if he is living in a flat or a house?

I would normally just say “I have to go to his place today.” I wouldn’t use “home” like in your example; it feels like it creates a weird emphasis on it being his home.
adzenith's user avatar
  • 135
0 votes

Use of Indefinite Articles(a,an)

Honestly, many of the answers here miss the point. It has little to do with pronouncing the “h”, though it would of course always be “an hotel” if it not be pronounced. Simply put, it is generally ...
Zorf's user avatar
  • 101
3 votes
Accepted

When does the end of the trip happen if we say "they had a trip to a candy factory"?

The phrases "beginning of a trip" and "end of a trip" are not rigidly defined in English. You have to look at the context and apply common sense. "Beginning of a trip" ...
Jay's user avatar
  • 65.6k
1 vote

How to express a candle in a burning state?

The candle is burning The candle is lit Both are fine and essentially mean the same thing, but 'burning' perhaps emphasises the candle being used up - a candle "burns down" and then goes ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 102k
0 votes

Why is between abbreviated as b/w?

Personally as an Indian student, I have seen many students use b/w in their lecture notes instead of between. I also started using it as it lessens the time required to write it.
Maria Ben Varghese's user avatar
1 vote

What words of endearment may I use for describing a misbehaving child?

It seems to be BrE-specific, but the first word that came to mind for me was "tyke". From Cambridge dictionary: a child who behaves badly in a way that is funny rather than serious
Especially Lime's user avatar
-1 votes

What words of endearment may I use for describing a misbehaving child?

I find that English, unfortunately, does not have a great number of words to suit this particular purpose. Most of them can have very negative connotations, especially if heard by others who do not ...
End Anti-Semitic Hate's user avatar
1 vote

What words of endearment may I use for describing a misbehaving child?

A pretty non offensive, endearing way to refer to a misbehaving child is to replace their name with 'Trouble'. You can also use it when they are not misbehaving at the moment but often tend to. I once ...
Judith Jones's user avatar
1 vote

How to express a candle in a burning state?

You could also describe the candle's state by saying that it is alight — which means that it's: burning, lit, on fire. and/or that it's: shining with light; luminous, radiant
gidds's user avatar
  • 1,065
0 votes

Usage of the word "and"

The answer is C. But I was wondering why the option A cannot be right. To directly address your question, there is no reason why the answer couldn't be A (Save), B (Spends), or C (Wastes). All three ...
fatalerrer's user avatar
0 votes

What is the verbal phrase for "making a candle stop burning"?

What is the verbal phrase for "making a candle stop burning"? The following are all valid, and roughly in order of how often they are used: 1. Blow out "You can blow out the candles ...
fatalerrer's user avatar
1 vote

What is the verbal phrase for "making a candle stop burning"?

A century ago you'd have been far more likely to snuff the candle, rather than blow it out... But as you can see from this chart, although snuff has declined considerably, you should double the ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
0 votes

Usage of the word "and"

I think this is a poor question, because all 4 choices are at least plausible. "My good friend Ben is very poor and he never saves money." If the speaker is discussing which of his friends ...
Jay's user avatar
  • 65.6k
2 votes

Usage of the word "and"

(a) My good friend Ben is very poor because he never saves money. This is an acceptable sentence. The two independent clauses are joined with because, it explains why Ben is poor; he cannot save money ...
Mari-Lou A's user avatar
  • 27.2k
4 votes

How to express a candle in a burning state?

Lighted candle is more idiomatic than lit candle. (See this Ngram). (In response to comments) Well, it feels much more idiomatic to me (70+). According to one of the results, Ebenezer Brewer in 1882 ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
2 votes

What words of endearment may I use for describing a misbehaving child?

I used to read and hear imp, it sounds almost cute but perhaps it's not so common nowadays. She's [a bit of] an imp This tells the listener that the small child sometimes misbehaves. I believe ...
Mari-Lou A's user avatar
  • 27.2k
15 votes

How to express a candle in a burning state?

Yes, a lit candle or the candle is lit. "Lit" is one of these participles that has become, or is becoming, an adjective. But "burning" is also used: Keep lit candles away from ...
James K's user avatar
  • 219k
6 votes

What words of endearment may I use for describing a misbehaving child?

Out of those rascal is common enough to be understood (if still a little old-fashioned) and the most likely to be affectionate out of context. Most of those words are usually used to refer to adults ...
Maciej Stachowski's user avatar
13 votes

What words of endearment may I use for describing a misbehaving child?

This is enormously family dependent, and rapidly changing. Words like "scamp" or "rapscallion" or "scalliwag" now seem rather dated. "Cheeky monkey" seemed ...
James K's user avatar
  • 219k
2 votes

What words of endearment may I use for describing a misbehaving child?

Some possibilities would be "scamp" or "terror". Note, phrases like this would usually be used as an exclamation, rather than as full sentences: You little scamp! You terror!
Daniel Roseman's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

Is "I am all against it" a counterpart of "I am all for it"?

Yes, we can say to be against something , but I'm all for it is a common idiom and this Ngram shows that I'm all against it is very much less common.
Kate Bunting's user avatar
4 votes

If I am still happy now, "I am happy to talk to an old friend last week" an acceptable structure?

(1) is wrong. If you are happy to do something, you are willing to do it, so you can't use the expression of something you did last week. (2) and (3) are OK.
Kate Bunting's user avatar
0 votes

Can I say "let's eat. Hurry up!" to just one person while I am not eating or about to eat?

We sometimes use "us" when giving commands to "soften" them. By including yourself in those being told what to do, it sounds less like an order and more like a suggestion or idea. ...
Jay's user avatar
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5 votes
Accepted

Noun phrase with adjective

"Since being tall" is not correct. You need to use "becoming tall". The meaning of "becoming tall" is "change from short to tall" and you mean "from the ...
James K's user avatar
  • 219k
-1 votes

Can I say "let's eat. Hurry up!" to just one person while I am not eating or about to eat?

The Oxford Dictionary says "let’s [no passive] used for making suggestions or as a polite way of telling people what you want them to do" Right, so whenever you make a suggestion or want to ...
Lambie's user avatar
  • 44.9k
0 votes

Do you say "my car is high on fuel" as a counterpart of "my car is low on fuel"?

I'm actually going to argue that "my car is high on fuel" is a perfectly acceptable thing to say. It's unusual to be sure ("good on fuel" would likely be more typical) and, as ...
Matthew's user avatar
  • 241
11 votes

Do you say "my car is high on fuel" as a counterpart of "my car is low on fuel"?

As you know, the phrase "we're low on fuel" essentially means "the amount of fuel we have is less than we would like it to be" or "it would be better if we had more fuel."...
Tanner Swett's user avatar
  • 5,932
3 votes

Do you say "my car is high on fuel" as a counterpart of "my car is low on fuel"?

“Low on fuel” is a fixed expression that cannot be easily modified. “I’m high on fuel” means I’m a drug addict who was been sniffing fuel to get high. Don’t do this. “My car is full of fuel” means I’m ...
gnasher729's user avatar
  • 3,871
1 vote

Do you say "my car is high on fuel" as a counterpart of "my car is low on fuel"?

While this is only slightly different than one of the other answers, I think "I've got a full tank" is the most-used phrase, at least as far as I've heard. If you wanted to specifically ...
Tim Hardy's user avatar
  • 111
7 votes

Do you say "my car is high on fuel" as a counterpart of "my car is low on fuel"?

If you want to use a similar phrasing, you could say you are "good on fuel"- this doesn't mean necessarily that you have a lot, but that you have enough. Good - adjective h (informal) : ...
Edward's user avatar
  • 171
5 votes
Accepted

Another view of since

You don't say where you found the 'explanation', but it isn't a very good one. It is five years since I had my accident uses the simple past tense to refer to a single event that happened five years ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
1 vote

What is the difference between a final draft and a final version?

They would pretty much mean the same thing. When working on an essay (for example) you create a first draft. You improve, edit or rewrite, that is your second draft. You improve the second draft, ...
James K's user avatar
  • 219k
45 votes
Accepted

Do you say "my car is high on fuel" as a counterpart of "my car is low on fuel"?

No, "high on fuel" is not an idiomatic opposite for "low on fuel". An idiomatic opposite would be, "my tank is nearly full." While high can be the opposite of low, it's ...
Juhasz's user avatar
  • 9,794
0 votes
Accepted

What the usage of "have sufficient in common" is?

'Sufficient' is always contextual. It means enough, adequate, and so there has to be a stated purpose or condition. We'd expect that to be introduced by a preposition like "to" or "for&...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 102k
1 vote
Accepted

Usage of In ,for and within

None of these are valid. 1, and 3 are strange and no-idiomatic (I can't work out what these mean) 2. means that he became tall two years ago and is still tall now. The main mistake is to use "...
James K's user avatar
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