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What do you call a place where certain ideas are prevalent?

You can use stronghold figuratively which is also prevalent in political context. figurative and in figurative contexts. Esp.: a place where a particular cause or belief is strongly defended or ...
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Is this a correct way to say that I do not care much about money?

No it is wrong, it will only conguse readers, I have provided other alternatives, but they are usually used when calling someone that word, and not yourself. "cheapskate" is a viable option ...
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1 vote

What do you call a place where certain ideas are prevalent?

"Hotbed" could work. Also consider "bastion", which is often used to describe a place in which certain political sentiments are strongly held: anything seen as preserving or ...
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1 vote

Interpretation of "the affairs of [these] subjects had to be administered too"

This is subject in the sense of 'citizen'. There were people of all those nationalities living in Finland. (Presumably the thing that was becoming essential was administrators knowing numerous ...
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1 vote

Thank you for (spending / putting / taking) your time

In case you would like a more formal phrase, for instance used in a business context, a good alternative would be (GrammarHow): Thank you for dedicating your time to our project
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1 vote

Let me squeak a phase four in there

This is not a standard expression. It is a mixture of "squeak" = speak in a high-pitched, quiet, timid voice (and perhaps, "squeak", a sound made when two unlubricated things rub ...
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2 votes

How to express wait for (at most) how long and wait for something at the same time

You have two things to say, so it's fine to use two sentences. In other software I've seen things like Waiting for remote host. This may take several minutes... Feel free to use "ten minutes&...
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0 votes

stooped or kicked in "He laughed and stooped them all into the river."?

I think the grammar and syntax of the piece are so bad in places that it really is of no import whether that one word is stooped or scooped, or anything else for that matter. I would theorise that the ...
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1 vote

stooped or kicked in "He laughed and stooped them all into the river."?

To my ear, it sounds like scooped, which makes much more sense. The makers of the video probably took it from the page A Little Mouse Who Was A Princess: Walking through the jungle, they came near a ...
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1 vote
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stooped or kicked in "He laughed and stooped them all into the river."?

To my ears, the spoken dialogue says 'he laughed and shoot them all into the river". I guess this may be American rural dialect (in some region) for 'shot' (you can shoot something [somewhere] ...
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1 vote

Is "spaced by 1 meter" correct English?

"Spaced apart" may be commonly used, but it is a horrible grammatical error called a pleonasm (like "round circle", "kicking with your feet", "foot pedal" - &...
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1 vote

Is "beauty king" or "handsome king" the counterpart of "beauty queen"?

The is no general term for a man who wins a male "handsome" contest for the simple reason that such contests do not generally exist. I would not be surprised if some such contests exist (and ...
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Is it "finger clicking" or "finger snapping"?

Yes "snap your fingers" is the common phrase, but "clicking" is also an alternative. The image you searched was even labelled as "finger snapping"! Snapping (or clicking)...
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2 votes

Is it "finger clicking" or "finger snapping"?

to snap one's fingers is the common phrase. It has nothing to do with digital mayhem; rather it means to produce a snap sound with the fingers, as if by breaking a twig. I think the actual sound is ...
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0 votes

Is "beauty king" or "handsome king" the counterpart of "beauty queen"?

"Mister" can also be used in combination with another word to refer to someone who is regarded as the personification of, or master of, a particular field or subject, especially in the ...
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1 vote
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What word should I use to describe the "ending/end" of a committee, work group etc?

A lot of your provided words are good, I would suggest: dissolved/terminated In order for a work group or committee to be dissolved/terminated, the following criteria must be satisfied. Dissolution/...
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0 votes

Is it weird to say "lo" and "yea" nowadays?

No. It's not weird to hear someone say these words, but they are mostly considered archaic and rarely heard in everyday speech today, except for perhaps a few expressions where they have survived, ...
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5 votes
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What do you call someone who does not drink alcoholic beverages at all?

Teetotaller is the noun which is used for such a person, i.e., a person who NEVER drinks alcohol. Sober is an adjective which means not drunk. It doesn't mean never drunk - it says nothing about ...
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0 votes

What is the meaning of "wherein" in this context?

Lexico: In which. 'the situation wherein the information will eventually be used' So it could be replaced with "in the way that". This is ironic in the way that the song is a farewell ...
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1 vote

Correct form for frontend, backend and fullstack

Usually this is the case: full stack developer front-end developer back-end developer
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  • 5,597
1 vote

How write a word for "× "?

In US English, we would usually just call it an X. For example, The X mark symbol đź—´ (also known as a cross, cross-mark, x sign, ex symbol) is often used in documents as a sign of refusal, reject, ...
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2 votes

May I add a word to in some range expression when reading it?

Yes, 12-45 would be spoken as twelve to forty-five. otherwise, the figures would sound like times of day or dates! As others have commented, your sentence should read with teams of 12-45 people aged ...
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-1 votes

Does "all day" refer just 1 day or every day?

Saying "He plays all day every day" is needed: "all day" to show the length of time this goes on in a day, "every day" to show this is continual.
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3 votes

What do you call the pointy parts of a text bubble that's not the tail?

As a direct description of their appearance I agree with @PPH, however as @DialFrost points out, there are other levels of understanding. An artist is likely to refer to any changes (and just the ...
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12 votes
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What do you call the pointy parts of a text bubble that's not the tail?

I would use the word "spike". (And in this particular case triple spike.) Here are some links: Metal speech bubble with spikes Wooden speech bubble with spikes Google Images search result
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1 vote

Does "attempt" in past-tense imply failure?

Your two given contexts imply failure, yes. If it says something after the "attempt" to retry it, it implies that you have failed and have to wait for the next try. If one just says: I ...
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13 votes

What do you call the pointy parts of a text bubble that's not the tail?

It represents the radio transmission of someone talking to the character using spikes, in this case a triple spike. Usually it is for announcements or sound effects. I don't think there is an official ...
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0 votes

Is there a better synonym to "non-intrusive"?

You could call it "unobtrusive" or "discreet": Unobtrusive: Not conspicuous or attracting attention Source Discreet: Intentionally unobtrusive Source
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3 votes

How do I convey that I am bad at remembering things?

"I have a bad memory" sounds a lot like I remember something bad that happened to me. While that is grammatically speaking a correct possible interpretation, a listener will be perfectly ...
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-1 votes

What is the semantic difference between "paid" and "payed? "

"payed" is incorrect. "Paid" is the past tense of "pay". I don't know why you see such things online, but you shouldn't copy them.
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1 vote

What is the semantic difference between "paid" and "payed? "

The past form of the verb pay is "paid", unless you are using the very rare homonym "pay = cover with pitch or tar as waterproofing on a boat" (This word has a different origin ...
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5 votes

How do I convey that I am bad at remembering things?

As you can see, there are lots of options, but "I have a bad memory" is also just fine. It does have that ambiguity, as a matter of the meanings of the words, but people will know what you ...
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4 votes

How do I convey that I am bad at remembering things?

A good word for this is forgetful. DialFrost’s suggestion of absentminded or absent-minded is another great one. We often describe intelligent people as absent-minded. A few of the others have, to ...
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1 vote

How do I convey that I am bad at remembering things?

"absentminded" is a perfect fit here: tending to forget or fail to notice things Source Strongest option as well on our sister site here
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5 votes

How do I convey that I am bad at remembering things?

A common idiomatic expression is having the memory of a goldfish. To have an exceptionally poor memory. An allusion to the myth that goldfish can't remember anything for longer than a few seconds. ...
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12 votes

How do I convey that I am bad at remembering things?

Of course you can say: I am bad at remembering things. ;-( But more commonly, you use: bad/poor/terrible memory A student with a poor memory may struggle in school. And if you have a really bad ...
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3 votes

How do I convey that I am bad at remembering things?

You have choices: I have a poor memory. I am forgetful. There are holes in my memory. My memory is often a blank. Those express the idea that memories are missing. Sometimes you want to say that you ...
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0 votes

"to have been to" and "to have gone to". Which should I use?

Both of I have been to London three times. I have gone to London three times. are grammatically correct, ans both seem quite natural to me, although I believe that the version with "been" ...
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"to have been to" and "to have gone to". Which should I use?

"have been" and "have gone" in your context actually have the same meaning and are both perfectly fine. "I have been skiing three times" is correct. Alternative (similar ...
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1 vote

What do you call the person who goes through the minutes after a meeting and checks that everything is correct?

This sounds like a proofreader. This may not be the official title of the person (especially in a small company where everyone wears many hats), but it can be. For example, see this old job ...
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3 votes
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add pollution to the air VS add air pollution

My own inclination would be to use ...toxic inks add pollution to the air. Everyone would know what you meant if you said ...add air pollution, but strictly speaking "air pollution" is not a ...
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1 vote

add pollution to the air VS add air pollution

"Add air pollution" is perfectly fine, as it already shows how pollition goes into the air. There is no need for changing this.
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2 votes
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What do you call the person who goes through the minutes after a meeting and checks that everything is correct?

I don't know about elsewhere, but here in the UK, at a meeting, someone will be designated to be the minute taker (can be hyphenated as 'minute-taker'). This may be someone who is also a participant ...
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1 vote

The rate for a room is £30, but breakfast is extra.(the verb "be" as "exist")

"Is" here is being used as a copula, that is as a sort of grammatical equals sign. When a form of "to be" is used as copula, in means that two things are equal or identical in ...
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2 votes

Imagine two patients presenting for emergency care with aching jaw pain

Can the verb 'present' be used as an intransitive one? Yes, this is a specialised medical use of the word. MEDICINE : (of a patient) come forward for initial medical examination for a particular ...
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1 vote
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a fourteen-day holiday vs fourteen days' holiday

It could be either - but if you are using the indefinite article it needs to be the first. The choice is: I am going away for a fourteen-day holiday or I'm going away for fourteen days holiday. Each ...
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1 vote

Example of the expression in the context

I don't think there is any non-Biblical context. See the story of 'Dives' and Lazarus, which inspired a folk song as well as paintings.
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