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The correct capital G and J in cursive

As an American who learned her cursive penmanship in the early 60s, I am shocked to see cursive capitals J and G, respectively, written that way. They seem to be switched in my humble opinion ("G" for ...
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28 votes
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"White glass" or "transparent glass"?

I wouldn't use "white glass"; just look it up on Google, that means something made of glass but with a white tint, and you can't see through that kind of glass. The glass in a household ...
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27 votes
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Should always use uppercase "I"?

Yes, in standard written English, we always capitalize I. From a Wikipedia page, I (and only this form of the pronoun) is the only pronoun that is always capitalized. The practice became ...
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24 votes

The correct capital G and J in cursive

As a Brit, I agree with the previous answer, that the capital letters are the wrong way round. Here is an example picture which looks correct for all letters to me: It's worth mentioning that, ...
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21 votes
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When to use in writing the characters "=" and ":"?

The symbol "=" is an "equals sign" and is normally a substitute for the word "equals". It is almost always used in writing mathematical equations or in writing about ...
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19 votes

"White glass" or "transparent glass"?

A mirror is usually referred to as "silvered glass", since it was often made by depositing silver nitrate on one side, as the Wikipedia entry describes. "White glass" would (to me) ...
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12 votes
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"In term of" vs. "in terms of"?

Referencing this article: According to Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English, "in terms of" can be used for describing either plural or singular fact or event. Here are two examples from ...
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12 votes
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How do you link "o" and "s" in cursive font?

See image. Used the word lost to illustrate with a real word.
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12 votes

The correct capital G and J in cursive

In the Palmer Method (1888) the G has the form shown next to the J above. You can see that the G is just a big version of the g, with a hugely exaggerated back-and-forth motion for the tail. The ...
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11 votes
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How to politely explain to someone that their lack of clarity is due to their ignorance?

Civil discourse rests on the cooperative principle, and any response should rest on the assumption that your interlocutor is following that principle.† Whatever your private opinion, your ...
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9 votes
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How to replace the name of the applicant writing a recommendation letter

I would not refer to X as applicant. That is X' role vis-à-vis the people you are writing to, not a role in which you know X. Instead, I would replace he at every third or fourth opportunity with X' ...
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9 votes

When italicizing, do I have to include 'a,' 'an,' and 'the'?

In my experience, in scholarly papers, when a new concept is defined or introduced, the article is never italicized, and the rest of the noun phrase is usually italicized. Here are several examples ...
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8 votes
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Effective way to teach English for non-native high school students

You need to do the following things: Create a strong context for the language you are teaching. Make it meaningful and important for them before you teach it. Make sure your students get controlled ...
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8 votes

Which tense to use in an academic paper when referring to past research?

Disciplines which follow the APA's Publications Manual are sternly (and to my mind ludicrously) literal-minded about such temporal references, but to the best of my knowledge everybody else in academe ...
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8 votes

Is "Dear" appropriate for any letter or card in UK English?

If you are sending a thank-you card, then it is perfectly OK to be informal and you can say pretty much whatever you like so long as it is polite. If you know the person only by their surname, then ...
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8 votes

"White glass" or "transparent glass"?

A normal everyday mirror that isn't colored is just a "mirror". There's no need to specify that it DOESN'T have an unusual quality. While "white glass" would mean translucent ...
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8 votes
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When italicizing, do I have to include 'a,' 'an,' and 'the'?

Generally, don't use italics for emphasis! the APA guide says: In general, avoid using italics for emphasis. Instead, rewrite your sentence to provide emphasis. You should only use italics if there ...
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7 votes
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Ligatures in 'shelfful'

Shelfful is different from scaffold because it is a compound word (shelf + full), so the two f's are truly separate. Removing the ligature between the f's re-emphasizes this construction. ...
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7 votes
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Frequency of tenses

Graeme Kennedy, ‘Preferred ways of putting things with implications for language teaching’, in Jan Svartvik, ed., Directions in Corpus Linguistics: Proceedings of Nobel Symposium 82 (Trends in ...
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I had a girlfriend, whom I didn't want to leave

I prefer your wording over Someone's alternative. Yours is simpler, more direct, and fits better with the overall tone of the paragraph. If you wanted, you could make it a single sentence by using ...
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7 votes
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Which tense to use in an academic paper when referring to past research?

It's perfectly fine to use the present tense for all research, even going back to ancient times; see here for another question about this. However, there is a way that you can usefully shift tense in ...
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7 votes
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Strange sounding instruction - I found you X

It's perfectly grammatical. In the same way that ditransitive verbs (like give and show) can be used in two ways, I gave the book to her. or I gave her the book. many verbs can have a ...
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7 votes
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Expressing potayto-potahto, tomayto-tomahto correctly in writing

Sure ay and ah are reasonable ways to express /ei/ and /a:/ informally. Splitting into syllables helps signal that these are phonetic spellings. But note that while there is a difference in British ...
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  • 152k
6 votes

"In the 1960s" or "of the 1960s"

In conversational or informal speech, of the 1960s and in the 1960s may be treated as equivalent, but there is a slight difference in meaning. In refers to a defined time period, whereas of refers to ...
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6 votes
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so called or so-called

GrammarBook has a nice explanation of whether to use hyphens in a situation like this: Generally, hyphenate two or more words when they come before a noun they modify and act as a single idea. This ...
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6 votes
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How to avoid using I's so frequently

There is nothing wrong with using "I" and you can't really use it "too much". A more reasonable concern would be not having enough sentence variety, and what appears to be using "I" too much is just a ...
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6 votes
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Why are all "sort" in Harry Potter written in capital letters?

A few hundred years ago, many English words were routinely capitalized. Now, we mostly use capitalization to indicate a few things: References to "God", "Jesus", or the "Holy Spirit" (even when ...
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6 votes
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Is there a reason that some wikipedia pages use "BC" while others use "BCE"?

Short answer: BC and BCE refer to the same periods. As Wikipedia pages are written by different authors, the exact usage of such details will vary. In most cases, the difference is meaningless. Longer ...
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5 votes
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If I want to write PERIOD, is it after dot? Is dot even required?

You are not doing that. Period. (two 'full stops') OK. "Period." is an exclamation. You could also use an "!". You are not doing that, period. (first comma, in last full stop) OK You are not ...
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