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40 votes
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The correct capital G and J in cursive

As an American who learned her cursive penmanship in the early 60s, I am shocked to see cursive capitals J and G, respectively, written that way. They seem to be switched in my humble opinion ("G" for ...
Lorel C.'s user avatar
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28 votes
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"White glass" or "transparent glass"?

I wouldn't use "white glass"; just look it up on Google, that means something made of glass but with a white tint, and you can't see through that kind of glass. The glass in a household ...
Glorfindel's user avatar
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25 votes

The correct capital G and J in cursive

As a Brit, I agree with the previous answer, that the capital letters are the wrong way round. Here is an example picture which looks correct for all letters to me: It's worth mentioning that, ...
Gamora's user avatar
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21 votes
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When to use in writing the characters "=" and ":"?

The symbol "=" is an "equals sign" and is normally a substitute for the word "equals". It is almost always used in writing mathematical equations or in writing about ...
David Siegel's user avatar
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19 votes

"White glass" or "transparent glass"?

A mirror is usually referred to as "silvered glass", since it was often made by depositing silver nitrate on one side, as the Wikipedia entry describes. "White glass" would (to me) ...
bkb105's user avatar
  • 191
12 votes
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How do you link "o" and "s" in cursive font?

See image. Used the word lost to illustrate with a real word.
LawrenceC's user avatar
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12 votes

The correct capital G and J in cursive

In the Palmer Method (1888) the G has the form shown next to the J above. You can see that the G is just a big version of the g, with a hugely exaggerated back-and-forth motion for the tail. The ...
djs's user avatar
  • 627
9 votes

When italicizing, do I have to include 'a,' 'an,' and 'the'?

In my experience, in scholarly papers, when a new concept is defined or introduced, the article is never italicized, and the rest of the noun phrase is usually italicized. Here are several examples ...
Tanner Swett's user avatar
  • 5,950
8 votes

Which tense to use in an academic paper when referring to past research?

Disciplines which follow the APA's Publications Manual are sternly (and to my mind ludicrously) literal-minded about such temporal references, but to the best of my knowledge everybody else in academe ...
StoneyB on hiatus's user avatar
8 votes

Is "Dear" appropriate for any letter or card in UK English?

If you are sending a thank-you card, then it is perfectly OK to be informal and you can say pretty much whatever you like so long as it is polite. If you know the person only by their surname, then ...
Mick's user avatar
  • 6,526
8 votes
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Why are all "sort" in Harry Potter written in capital letters?

A few hundred years ago, many English words were routinely capitalized. Now, we mostly use capitalization to indicate a few things: References to "God", "Jesus", or the "Holy Spirit" (even when ...
Jasper's user avatar
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8 votes
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Expressing potayto-potahto, tomayto-tomahto correctly in writing

Sure ay and ah are reasonable ways to express /ei/ and /a:/ informally. Splitting into syllables helps signal that these are phonetic spellings. But note that while there is a difference in British ...
James K's user avatar
  • 226k
8 votes

"White glass" or "transparent glass"?

A normal everyday mirror that isn't colored is just a "mirror". There's no need to specify that it DOESN'T have an unusual quality. While "white glass" would mean translucent ...
Darth Pseudonym's user avatar
8 votes
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When italicizing, do I have to include 'a,' 'an,' and 'the'?

Generally, don't use italics for emphasis! the APA guide says: In general, avoid using italics for emphasis. Instead, rewrite your sentence to provide emphasis. You should only use italics if there ...
James K's user avatar
  • 226k
7 votes
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Which tense to use in an academic paper when referring to past research?

It's perfectly fine to use the present tense for all research, even going back to ancient times; see here for another question about this. However, there is a way that you can usefully shift tense in ...
Ben Kovitz's user avatar
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7 votes
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I had a girlfriend, whom I didn't want to leave

I prefer your wording over Someone's alternative. Yours is simpler, more direct, and fits better with the overall tone of the paragraph. If you wanted, you could make it a single sentence by using ...
J.R.'s user avatar
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7 votes
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so called or so-called

GrammarBook has a nice explanation of whether to use hyphens in a situation like this: Generally, hyphenate two or more words when they come before a noun they modify and act as a single idea. This ...
JavaLatte's user avatar
  • 60k
7 votes

Should the suffix "III" be included in the salutation to a senator

The use of numerals like "III" only applies when you include a person's first name, so if you're just saying "Senator Smith", then "III" would be incorrect. If you said, &...
gotube's user avatar
  • 50.9k
7 votes

The difference between "Each cake's piece" and "Each piece of the cake"

"each piece of the cake" implies that there's one cake and refers to each piece of it. "each cake's piece" suggests that there are multiple cakes, and you're talking about one ...
Barmar's user avatar
  • 3,238
6 votes
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Strange sounding instruction - I found you X

It's perfectly grammatical. In the same way that ditransitive verbs (like give and show) can be used in two ways, I gave the book to her. or I gave her the book. many verbs can have a ...
Colin Fine's user avatar
  • 75.9k
6 votes
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Is there a reason that some wikipedia pages use "BC" while others use "BCE"?

Short answer: BC and BCE refer to the same periods. As Wikipedia pages are written by different authors, the exact usage of such details will vary. In most cases, the difference is meaningless. Longer ...
Jeffrey Carney's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

Why is "advanced english class" not capitalized in "The Perks of Being a Wallflower"?

You are right. English, when referring to language, the people, or the country, would always be conventionally capitalized. The text does use conventional capitalization for the first word of ...
choster's user avatar
  • 17.7k
5 votes

When we write, do we have to write "OK" instead of "Ok" or are both correct?

The important thing to understand is:      OK is written as if it were an an acronym even though it doesn't stand for anything but itself. So, the common practice in print is to write OK or O.K. or ...
Ben Kovitz's user avatar
  • 27.6k
5 votes

Was this sentence formed grammatically correct?

No, you don't need a conjunction or anything else between the two clauses. To so would unnecessarily separate the two objects of to ask. Let's look at two simpler sentences: John asked his friends ...
Alan Carmack's user avatar
5 votes

so called or so-called

While it is fine to use "so called", as JavaLatte shows in his comment, nowadays it's much more frequent to use the dash, "so-called", which is how I always write it. Also, the following word should ...
Andrew's user avatar
  • 88.4k
5 votes
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Why using firstly, secondly... in a writing is bad writing?

While probably not grammatically incorrect, there are two issues I can see. First, you can use the words 'First', 'Second', 'Third', etc. on their own, making the 'ly' unnecessary. Saying 'Firstly',...
relaxing's user avatar
  • 2,436
5 votes
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How to make phrase sentence about availability for a meeting

[I have been asked by the OP to post my comment as an answer. Initially I decided not to because it had already been posted by Peter, but as I disagree with part of Peter's answer (see my comment ...
TrevorD's user avatar
  • 819

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