New answers tagged

1

The link is for children learning to write at age 4. (or rather for their parents and teachers). It isn't really directed at non-native learners. Children are taught to break a word into syllables and sound out each syllable in order to attempt to spell the word. Syllables in English can be a single vowel or dipthong. "V" or combined with ...


3

Every syllable has one vowel This is an overgeneralization and is misleading. This may be true in some languages, but not in English. In English, a syllable can be composed to a diphtong, which is a unit that is a combination two vowels. A long vowel is also sometimes considered as a instance of two vowels. An English syllable also doesn't always have a ...


0

Either construction is fine, but the omission of the implied object (it) makes it a cleaner, more modern sounding sentence. An elevator arrived and two police officers stepped off to search the floor. An elevator arrived and two police officers stepped out to search the floor. Since you have already stated that the elevator had arrived, you do not need to ...


0

The verb tense is a bit odd here. And you really need to add something else if you are going to write at all well here. Man: Sorry... flying. Woman: Shakes her head and turns back to her magazine. Offering no sympathy is in itself a non-thing. That phrase usually is followed with a 'but' or something else to indicate what she did do.


0

I wrote several cover letters and usually started them with “To whom it may concern.” Not the best choice, frankly speaking. That’s a total cliche. “Dear Sir/Madam” is a little bit better. But after I researched this topic myself, I found this page https://www.getcoverletter.com/blog/how-to-address-a-cover-letter/ with some practical advice on addressing the ...


Top 50 recent answers are included