mkennedy
  • Member for 8 years, 10 months
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have got phrase for Americans
10 votes

This question and AlanCarmack's answer has gotten me to think about when I use "have/had got" and "have/had gotten." I grew up in the USA Midwest, plus 20 years in a heterogenous southern California ...

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It's clobbering time
10 votes

"It's clobbering time" probably was coined by Stan Lee for his and Jack Kirby's character the Thing. The Thing is the superhero code name of Ben Grimm. Ben is a pilot and the friend of Reed Richards, ...

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the meaning of "carved a device"
Accepted answer
9 votes

"Device" is a picture or emblem. In this case, someone carved into a wall or window frame, a hangman's gallows and a cardinal's hat hanging from the rope.

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What is the meaning of "notice to quit at once" and "Lotty points”
7 votes

I'm not familiar with the work. However, "Lotty", or Charlotte, could be a character in the book. If so, the old lord is saying that the pink-hatted girl could give "Lotty" points--pointers or help-...

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Meaning of "matched" in the given context
7 votes

Another way to write this sentence could be, "As the emperor walked to the royal court, his heart beat in time with the booming of the drums through the fort." The emperor's heart was beating at ...

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Single word for "able to be expensed"
7 votes

In US English, I've seen the term reimbursable used for a business expense for which your employer will repay you at a later date.

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Make exception for (X) in (Y)
4 votes

The idea is that if a company allows some workers to work remotely (from home or another office), they are often not treated as well as workers who are on-site. Remote workers are not as "visible" ...

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You'll keep this live
Accepted answer
4 votes

They're talking about a communications device or a tracking device. Fischer (or the other person) is to keep a microphone on or "live" so that Cobb can hear what's happening or follow their progress. ...

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What is the meaning of "fell off the curve"?
3 votes

The curve refers to a standardized graph probably of responses to questions that quantify how aware a patient is. As @Jdrupal mentioned in an answer, there's a growth curve that shows percentiles of ...

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"I have an emergency up here" vs "I have an emergency in here"?
3 votes

Neither one of those is idiomatic in American English. The operator will answer a call with something like, "9-1-1 operator. What is your emergency?" You would normally respond and state what the ...

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What's the difference between "sport facilities" and "modern equipment"?
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3 votes

Sports facilities could include a running track, swimming pool, soccer/baseball/rugby/football fields, basketball court, and so on. Modern equipment in the gym probably refers to treadmills, weight-...

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What is the synonym for //static picture of//?
3 votes

I'm having troubling replacing just "static picture of" without rewriting the rest of the sentence. That is because the phrase is linked with the preceding words to make "a dynamic rather than static ...

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"As an IT guy, please use both backups and version control.." Which guy is meant here?
3 votes

The statement, "As a(n) XX person," is short for "Speaking as a(n) XX person." That is, the person making the statement has expertise in a particular field or area and you should take their advice.

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I have not touched this matter a long time
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3 votes

In American English, I would use "material" or even "subject" rather than "matter." Thus, I have an exam in my university on Biology, and I haven't touched this material in a long time. An ...

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I don't understand what he is saying in a context
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2 votes

This dialogue is probably referencing a US-based college. There, it's common to take introductory classes that fulfill general requirements for your first two years. You may have an idea of what you ...

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"Trouble is now closer than earlier"
2 votes

It's understandable but slightly awkward in American English. A more idiomatic sentence would be: Trouble is now closer than before. Or a more formal version: Trouble is now closer than it was ...

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Meaning of "Russian tradition"
2 votes

"Russion" is almost certainly a typo for "Russian." This part of the paragraph comes from the statement that James used plain-speech terms to describe his writing rather than academic terminology. ...

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Another suitable word for attached
2 votes

A word that has, to me, a similar 'feel' as 'attached' is partial. I am partial to my current lifestyle and resist changing it.

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How to describe this font feature in English?
2 votes

It's a form of a vertical font or vertical typography. Vertical typography can have the characters 'upright', but the text is printed vertically. A variant is to print the words rotated 90 degrees to ...

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Searching for a word by pronunciation
2 votes

You can try to do a soundex match, like at this site. Soundex indexes words by pronunciation so you can often use it to find similar-sounding words.

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What preposition should I use here "Can you change a $20 note _____ two $10 notes"?
1 votes

A very idiomatic way to say this is: Could you change this twenty for two tens? No need to qualify it with bill or note or even dollars.

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There goes my buzz - meaning?
1 votes

The implication is that the old man is drinking alcohol. When you've had some alcohol--like 2 to 3 drinks--but before you're drunk, that state is sometimes called a "buzz." Now that Sunny reveals ...

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A typical local rule requires a mailbox to be offset the entire width of a shoulder off the road
1 votes

It's related to this definition found at dictionary.com Surveying. to establish (a line) parallel to a main survey line at an offset. In this case, it means to place or locate the mailbox several ...

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A sentences from Friends series
1 votes

The TV show Friends has been popular enough that it's possible to find descriptions of the episodes on Wikipedia. I have not seen the episode and am extrapolating some of my answer. If you post more ...

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Comparative construction with two adjectives
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1 votes

I'm a native American speaker. I would swap the order of the adjectives so that you get: I think you are smarter and more intelligent than what it seems. The end of the sentence doesn't sound ...

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the meaning of 'respectability' here
1 votes

A person who is not middle or upper class or otherwise can be considered "respectable" will show their age more, even if not physically off worse than a respectable person. Respectability ...

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What does ‘Limitless is riding the middle ground of CBS' freshman crop’ mean?
Accepted answer
1 votes

Let's break it down. "Freshman crop" means the shows that are new to CBS this viewing year. It includes any that has started since September 2015 or so. The "middle ground" means that the ratings for ...

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What does "catch" mean in this sentence?
1 votes

"a catch" is similar to "too good to be true." For instance, a great job offer except that the pay is low or a free lunch but you have to sit through a boring presentation. An incentive is a ...

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Can I use deficiency in this sentence
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1 votes

I would instead word it something something like this-- "Due to the lack of geographical points that represent the route between stops in the database, the related bus stops are connected by ...

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What is the difference between the two sentences below?
1 votes

To my native American English ear, the first statement is understandable, but not what someone would say. Instead, We were shocked that my father's voice has been hoarse since yesterday. The ...

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