1d
revised What is the meaning of “open” in “he swings the plastic strip open”?
improved formatting and used complete sentences
1d
revised In a week versus After a week
improved formatting and punctuation and added an important stipulation
Oct
10
revised Is there any conditional in this sentence?
moved up comment from OP into question
Oct
10
revised What is the meaning of “A is the good, B is the bad and C is the ugly”?
The comments are gone, so...
Oct
10
comment Word for 'most late'
You said, "I see plenty of uses of latest dated in the same sense." I'm just not so sure that's the "same sense." Similar, yes; same no. (Not trying to nit-pick, by the way, it's an interesting discussion.)
Oct
9
comment Word for 'most late'
When I look up "latest dated" on Google, most of the hits seem backward-looking, not forward-looking (e.g., Thirteen silver coins, the latest dated 1601, or The Latest Dated Cuneiform Tablet in the British Museum). As for sticking with the word latest, like I said, I agreed with most of your answer, but sometimes it's better to offer a learner a more natural-sounding alternative than a correct-but-awkward force-fit.
Oct
9
comment Word for 'most late'
I like everything in this answer except latest-dated, which seems a bit awkward. An alternative might be: "The November 11 interview is the farthest one out."
Oct
9
comment Word for 'most late'
A potential problem with latest, though, is some ambiguity. If I ask, "Which interview is latest?" some might assume I'm asking about latest in the afternoon, not latest on the calendar.
Oct
9
revised higher {than on vs. than that on vs. than that of}
deleted 14 characters in body; edited title
Oct
9
comment “steg” or “steglauncher”, cannot find a reasonable translation into German
This question is "off-topic" because it's a made-up word in a science fiction work. NOTE: When questions are closed, that is not meant to be punitive. It is simply a mechanism to prevent people from trying to answer questions that don't really have good answers. You actually did a good job asking this question in a way that we were able to figure out that it just happens to be a made-up word, not an actual English word. But there may have been no way to know that before you asked the question.
Oct
9
comment How can I choose between using (in) or (on)?
I think we tread on thin ice when we try to link idiomatic meanings of prepositions back to what you call their "most basic" meanings. Your answer might cause a learner to wonder why we say things like, "He had something heavy on his mind," or, "That event has been on her mind a lot these days," or why Ray Charles once crooned, "Just an old sweet song keeps Georgia on my mind." I think the real reason we use in instead of on in the OP's sentence is because the normal expression just happens to be bear in mind, not bear on mind, much like keep in mind or stay on track.
Oct
9
comment 'As the dot on the i' used as an expression
@whiskeychief - We can use it that way, and some probably do. But others might characterize that as a minor misuse of the expression. Cambridge defines that idiom to mean something that makes a good situation even better or an unexpected additional good thing. TFD says: An additional benefit or positive aspect to something that is already considered positive or beneficial. (I'm not trying to be pedantic; I just think this is good to point out.)
Oct
9
revised What does 'get ahold of' means?
added 4 characters in body
Oct
9
revised Non-countable nouns in English that end on “-s”
Shortened title
Oct
9
revised What does 'get ahold of' means?
added 8 characters in body
Oct
9
revised Meaning of this passage
added 45 characters in body; edited title
Oct
9
comment Meaning of this passage
@JeffM - I can see a couple reasons why it should be put on hold. For one, the OP should tell us where the text was found. For another, it should include more details about what is confusing. Is the OP having trouble with big words, like scrutinizing and hypocrite? Or is it the lengthiness of the sentence that is causing confusion?
Oct
9
comment More English nouns like “jeans”, “glasses”, “statistics”, and “shorts”, having no singular equivalent
@JVL - except in those relatively rare cases we use it as a verb or as a modifier (as in scissor kick, e.g.)
Oct
8
comment “a leader able to solve humanity's shared issues” - is “able” right word?
To be fair, the comment was referring to an earlier version of the question – although your opinion could apply to both versions.
Oct
8
comment which one: “so and such” or “Bla Bla Bla …”?
I, too, have not seen so and such, but I have seen such and so used in this context. “How would I say in Japanese, ‘I solve the Dirac Equation’?” They said such-and-so." is attributed to Richard Feynman; during her confirmation hearing, US Supreme Court Justice Ruth Ginsburg said, "One of your colleagues just said to me, well, in the case of United States v. Jackson (1987), you said such-and-so.. Yet another way to say it might be this and that.