Ryan M
  • Member for 1 year, 3 months
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  • California, USA
1 answers
3 votes
98 views
I have been involved in art/arts/the arts
3 votes

I would say that you have been involved in the arts. The arts refers to the general set of fields of which artistic/creative expression is a major part (such as writing, theatre, dance, painting, ...

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1 answers
2 votes
25 views
Can double "but"s be used in a sentence?
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1 votes

Isn't it a bit redundant? Yes, in that it would mean more or less the same thing without "nevertheless," but adding the extra word does add a bit of emphasis: it emphasizes the fact that ...

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1 answers
1 votes
34 views
Is it natural to say "hold the ball under your chin" or "hold the ball in your neck"?
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4 votes

(At least to me as a native American English speaker...) "Under my chin" is more natural. "In my neck" sounds like it was somehow inside the neck itself (that is, under the skin), ...

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3 answers
2 votes
66 views
Group of vs. Group in
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"members of a group" is more idiomatic for referring to a group of people as a whole. Other similar expressions include "employees of a company," "members of Congress," ...

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3 answers
0 votes
44 views
I'm not really seeing/I don't really see/I can't really see?
2 votes

They all sound correct and natural to me. If there's any difference between them, it's a minor difference in the level of confidence implied: "I'm not really seeing" sounds least confident (...

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1 answers
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28 views
Heads should roll
1 votes

You are indeed on the right track—specifically, it is saying that the people responsible should be severely punished (often, as in this case, fired). The standard form of this idiom is "heads ...

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1 answers
1 votes
31 views
Is ‘broken glass’ ambiguous?
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1 votes

Generally, "broken" refers to things that are currently broken. For glass specifically, there's mostly no practical way to fix glass to the point of removing the breakage, so it tends to ...

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1 answers
1 votes
16 views
10 seconds to be allowed <him to do so>
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1 votes

A more modern, clear way of writing that phrase, perhaps as a parenthetical (in parentheses or between em dashes) would be: he is to be allowed 10 seconds to do so The manner of speaking in the ...

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1 answers
0 votes
50 views
What is the difference between "state of the art" and "state-of-the-art"?
1 votes

The difference is that without hyphens, it's a noun, and with hyphens, it's an adjective. So you might say that a given piece of technology "represents the state of the art in its field," ...

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2 answers
3 votes
99 views
Differences between "English novel" and "novel in English"
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2 votes

You're right: "English novel" is ambiguous. Which you should use depends on the context: in some contexts, it may be clear that you're referring to language (e.g., "Compared to novels ...

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1 answers
1 votes
22 views
What are the terms for the process of closing a business or a company?
1 votes

The idiomatic phrase for this in American English would be "going out of business." For example, this article uses this term a number of times (also "went out of business" in the ...

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7 answers
9 votes
3k views
What is the correct way to say I had to move my bike that went under the car in a crash?
15 votes

It took you some time to extricate the bike from under the car. Merriam Webster defines "extricate" as "to free or remove from an entanglement or difficulty" and notes that it &...

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1 answers
4 votes
31 views
Word for the sound of soft blowing air from an air purifier
2 votes

The closest single word I can think of is "whir," for which Oxford gives an example sentence of "the ceiling fans whirred in the smoky air." If you're okay with multiple words, &...

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1 answers
1 votes
25 views
Is there any difference between "ability or not to be counted" and "ability to be counted or not"?
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1 votes

Neither of these strike me as quite correct. I would have written this as either "ability (or lack thereof) to be counted" or "ability or inability to be counted." My reasoning ...

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2 answers
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30 views
Why do these sentences use "them" and not "their"?
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2 votes

It's a dialect/slang, but it doesn't mean "their"—it means "those." The dialect in question is primarily associated with the Appalachian and southern regions of the United States. ...

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2 answers
2 votes
59 views
'A high pyramid' or 'a tall pyramid'—which is correct and why?
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5 votes

I think your teacher is mistaken. Generally, "tall" refers to height (how tall something is), while "high" refers to location. I would personally refer to "the tallest ...

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5 answers
21 votes
4k views
Why is it that when we say a balloon pops, we say "exploded" not "imploded"?
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91 votes

A balloon contains air under pressure. When it pops, the air expands. Merriam-Webster defines "explode" as, among other things: to burst forth with sudden violence or noise from internal ...

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1 answers
2 votes
29 views
What is a balance of a chapter in a book?
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1 votes

This is a slightly unusual (but not uncommon) use of "balance" to mean "remainder." It means that the answer will be given in the part of the chapter after what was already ...

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2 answers
2 votes
798 views
Difference between "develop" and "create"
3 votes

There's not much difference in this example. "Developing" new drugs puts more emphasis on the amount of work required to create the drugs—they cannot simply be created with what they ...

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6 votes
2k views
Is "Don't be" correct as a response to "I am sorry"?
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15 votes

It's correct. It's a command telling the person who is sorry not to be sorry, generally because the speaker believes that person has nothing to be sorry for (in other words, the speaker believes that ...

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2 answers
1 votes
138 views
Meaning of "tapped into"
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1 votes

It means that he's connected with and has access to the intelligence services (much in the way that "tapping into" a keg would connect to and give access to the contents of the keg. It ...

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1 answers
2 votes
26 views
Alternatives to "hard cases make bad law"
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1 votes

I've always heard this as "bad facts make bad law." In other words, cases with a particularly unlikable litigant—for example, a defendant who is a serial killer or rapist whose rights were ...

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1 answers
1 votes
31 views
Can a "poem" mean something else than its usual meaning? (A sentence from H.P. Lovecraft's work)
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This seems to be, as you suggest, a metaphor. The marble hall (a peristyle) was poetic in design, possibly referring to both its beauty and artfulness, but also its poetic rhythm of columns around the ...

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2 answers
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40 views
Can I express counting like this?
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0 votes

The only case where a native speaker would say "half 4" would be talking about the time in British English, meaning "half an hour past four o'clock" (4:30). You could say that two ...

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1 answers
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7 views
when it comes to disclosure of personal information
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From a purely grammatical context, it's somewhat ambiguous, and could refer to either—though usually if it were about asking the client for personal information, that would be described as a request ...

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1 answers
1 votes
167 views
In a longer time or For a longer time
1 votes

"for a longer time" is correct; "in a longer time" is not. The reason is because what you are describing is the duration of the travel to the workplace. "For _____" is ...

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3 answers
5 votes
2k views
What do you call a chalkboard punishment?
19 votes

This punishment is commonly referred to as "writing lines," which can refer to doing so on a chalkboard, a whiteboard, a piece of paper, etc. I'm not sure if anyone has tried to have a ...

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