Sean Jepson
  • Member for 5 months
  • Last seen more than a month ago
What does the word “row” mean in this context?
2 votes

It’s a very old word for narrow street/road. Some streets in the UK are still called ‘row’ though not many. For most English people it would sound very Dickensian.

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What's the correct word for when you stop using a syllabus?
Accepted answer
2 votes

‘Discontinued’ is the most appropriate though you wouldn’t really need to use it because as the course Itself has been discontinued it stands to reason that it’s contents (the syllabus) have too. You ...

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What does "turn-over tops" mean in this context?
1 votes

It means that he’s folded the top of his boots down/folded them over the top.

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Meaning of "get to it" in context
1 votes

It implies a sense of urgency to whatever the ‘it’ is i.e ‘Let’s get to it!’ It’s quite American and I don’t think I’ve ever heard an English person say it. It would be seen as sounding a bit silly in ...

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Two different meanings of "better still" and use
1 votes

Basically ‘better still’ is very similar to even better. It’s really just a more elegant way of saying it. It’s used in a comparative way. I think the dictionary definition is a bit clumsy and has ...

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Does A bit + adj sound right?
1 votes

It’s clear what you mean though it sounds a bit clumsy. You wouldn’t really use ‘for a bit’ in that context. You need a verb in sentence one i.e. ‘In order to do a bit less work we skipped that part’ ...

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