Snowy Oz
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Word for something that's always reliable, but never the best?
Accepted answer
7 votes

There are probably lots of ways to express this, but it would depend on the context. "Fallback" (n), or "Backup" are likely easy one word substitutes. English tends to be less expressive via single ...

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What does this sentence mean? "not any more than" phrase
3 votes

In this context, I would take the phrase "don't do any damn more" to semantically mean "the same amount". The subtlety in this turn of phrase is that all schools think or sell that they mould more ...

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What is the grammar of "for A to be considered B, …"?
2 votes

I think you can change the order of the sentence to: To be considered raw, food must not have been heated over 46C. To be considered as a suspect case of Ebola, a person... To be seen as one of the ...

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He is sent a student for
1 votes

I was going to comment under Sam's answer, but decided this probably needs it's own answer. to send for Is an English phrasal verb (https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/...

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'to seem like' : Part of speech and significance of 'like'?
1 votes

I'm not sure it's a matter of grammar - seems (:)) more like semantics to me. Like would be employed when it's actually like something (a noun). (1) (it) Seems like the car. vs (2) (it) Seems the ...

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"Could" in the context of giving an offer
1 votes

This is a tricky English verb, it's base being "to be able to". When conjugated, there are some extended or fixed expression uses to adjust English politeness level. Here's a really good run down of ...

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In A Job, At A Job
1 votes

Using Verb + Preposition, work in would be the standard usage. Work at is also permissible, but has the additional meaning for a specific place: She works at McDonald's. He works at the ...

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Which meaning of 'fault' applies?
1 votes

I believe he's is talking about parliament here not the Supreme Court. “It had a lot of attractions. In parliament... In that case I take the meaning of "fault" to be borrowing a geological term - ...

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Is there any expression/word for "almost inaccessible"?
1 votes

I would go with "near inaccessible". But "almost inaccessible" is clean too. As in To get to the near inaccessible Mount Doom we trekked for weeks while facing countless dangers.

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difficulty + ...ing or difficulty in +...ing
0 votes

I think you've picked a hard one! So, this is a fixed expression: (see http://www.englishpage.com/gerunds/expression_ing.htm) And... here are my thoughts: difficulty is a noun, but in the above ...

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