Chris Bouchard
  • Member for 6 years, 11 months
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4 answers
9 votes
2k views
What does "until she passes the five-year mark, Dad’s record to date" mean here?
Accepted answer
12 votes

I'll break the passage up into two parts to address your two questions. I can’t be bothered to spend much time on her until she passes the five-year mark, … The narrator is using mark here to mean ...

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4 answers
14 votes
3k views
banned in vs banned from?
7 votes

In both cases, we have a form of the verb ban plus a prepositional phrase. In both cases, we're using ban to mean “prohibit especially by legal means.” In the case of banned in, the preposition in ...

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1 answers
3 votes
58k views
give input on VS. give input into
Accepted answer
6 votes

"Give input into" and "give input on" have different meanings. To give input into something is to provide information or resources. I would give input to a computer program, or perhaps give input to a ...

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5 answers
10 votes
4k views
"And in the master's chambers, they gathered for the feast"
3 votes

So they gathered in the master's bedrooms for the feast? That doesn't make much sense to me, Yes, that's the reaction that most native speakers have, too. You've chosen a great song, but one that may ...

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5 answers
3 votes
7k views
Is it "sit on my lap" or "sit in my lap"?
3 votes

In General According to Google Ngrams, they two phrases are used almost interchangeably, with “in my lap” slightly ahead. As an American English speaker, I wouldn't think twice about either. In ...

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4 answers
5 votes
2k views
"citation" vs. "quote"
2 votes

To quote is to reproduce someone else's words exactly. The noun quotation means something a piece of text that was quoted. Technically, the noun quote refers to punctuation marks ("", '') placed ...

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1 answers
0 votes
33 views
showing up to a four-alarm fire with an eyedropper full of water
Accepted answer
1 votes

That's very strong sarcasm (and strong criticism). A “four-alarm fire”, or in general a multiple-alarm fire, is a raging inferno. The name comes from the alarm bells that would ring in a fire station —...

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2 answers
5 votes
888 views
Which pronoun (its or their) should be used for a single animal?
1 votes

TL;DR: If this is for a test, the correct answer is probably (as others have said) to use its. Otherwise, read on. Speaking as someone who uses “singular they” regularly, I'd understand either of ...

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1 answers
1 votes
29 views
I don't understand the grammar of this sentence
Accepted answer
1 votes

I think Kreiri is correct in their comment. This is a typo, and the correct sentence should be Let's see what happens if we attach it to the object dynamically:

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1 answers
1 votes
23 views
Cannot understand the Subject of this sentence?
Accepted answer
1 votes

Here “setting the original value as this” is a participle phrase modifying “our new function”. I'm not entirely sure this is good style, but it's something I've seen (and written) frequently in ...

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4 answers
5 votes
613 views
Treated as so much more cargo
1 votes

Many people have explained the "as so much" part. If the quote read and the passengers were treated as so much cargo (without "more") then I would completely agree with Tim. I feel like the ...

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5 answers
7 votes
1k views
Plural and singular nouns: do "A cat is an animal" and "Cats are animals" mean the same thing?
0 votes

Yes, they mean approximately the same thing. When we make general statements in English, we can frequently use either a singular or a plural subject. If we use a singular subject, we interpret the ...

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2 answers
1 votes
25 views
Will _ would and Can_Could differences
0 votes

I agree with you. If we think of “gatherings,” “funerals,” etc., as classes of events, then using will and can might feel more natural, and using would and could feels like we're talking about a ...

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2 answers
1 votes
116 views
What is the right preposition when you shoot?
0 votes

I don't think I'd use the same construction for a gun and a camera. For a gun, I agree with SoronelHaetir, either at or for seems fine. But for a camera, it feels awkward to me to say, “You should ...

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4 answers
7 votes
1k views
What does the word labor mean in this context?
-1 votes

My understanding, as a native speaker, is that it is simply the normal meaning of labored: “worked.” The aura of suspicion under which I labored … It's true, as several answers have mentioned, that ...

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