David42
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Is there a verb that means "to accept doing something unwillingly just to make the other person stop nagging"?
40 votes

to give in is defined as "to finally agree to what someone wants, after refusing for a period of time" (Cambridge English Dictionary). This sense of "give" used in this metaphor is ...

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Day vs 24h day?
19 votes

Yes, the word "day" can mean the entire 24-hour period. But it can also mean just the part where the Sun is above the horizon. It can also mean the part of the day during which work and other "daytime"...

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Why is, "If I don't use the microphone, nobody will hear me," not considered a double negative
18 votes

The statement that one should not use a double negative is a caution against a particular dialect form well-known to native English speakers. It is something primary school teachers say to native ...

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Neutral equivalent to the attributive use of the adjective "so-called"
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17 votes

Here are a few more substitute terms: The objective of the de-identification process is to remove anything considered Protected Health Information (PHI). The objective of the de-identification ...

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What does "a singularly sh*t strategy" mean in "Showing images is a singularly sh*t strategy"?
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15 votes

No. Andy North is saying that this strategy is unpleasant and worthless, just like excrement. The word "singularly" here means "unusually". Insulting people's beliefs is an ...

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What is a Baby Gap?
8 votes

The Gap is a well-known chain of clothing stores. The stores focus on casual and athletic clothing. The customers are mainly teenagers and young adults. A Baby Gap is a clothing store in the Gap chain ...

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What does "bare up" mean in here?
8 votes

According to Webster's Ninth Collegiate Dictionary, "bare" is the archaic past tense of "bear". In turn "to bear" means to carry. So, the expression "bare up the ark" means that the water supported ...

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Curious use of the definite article with body parts in dictionary definitions
7 votes

The definite article is sometimes used to indicate that the noun refers to a type rather than to a specific person or thing. For example: The beginning writer faces many frustrations. Unless there ...

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Can "Tirade" be used for a *non-angry* lengthy, boring speech/text?
6 votes

Tirade strongly suggests a long loud speach full of angry or unbalanced criticisms and complaints. In contrast a harangue suggests a long tedious and pushy persuasive speach, but not necessarily an ...

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Difference between "He's in prison" and "He's in the prison"
6 votes

The phrase "He is in prison." means that he is confined in a prison somewhere. His actual physical location is not important. This phrase indicates his status as a prisoner. The phrase "He is in the ...

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Abdomen vs. stomach vs. belly
5 votes

All three words can refer to the part of the body between the chest and the pelvis. Which is used depends on the context and the level of formality desired. The word "abdomen" is used in ...

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Is "neither - nor" popular in US English?
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5 votes

Yes, this expression is used, but it is a special-purpose expression. It is used to emphasis that the thing named is unacceptable. It can be used to sternly forbid someone to do something: In future ...

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'I wouldn't vote for Clinton if you paid me': what does this mean?
5 votes

As others have correctly pointed out, there is an implied "even" in this sentence. This expression is part of a family of similar expressions. In them the speaker expresses his strong disinclination ...

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Meaning of "A bigger boy ran in the back door, and kicked it to"
4 votes

Here the word "to" means "into contact especially with the frame — used of a door or a window" (Merriam Webster)

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In everyday English, How to express "to pull the drawer open so hard that it falls off"?
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4 votes

I would say: He pulled the drawer out so hard it came off the track and fell on the floor. You could also say "pulled the drawer open", but "open" refers to his goal, not to what happened. It ...

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What's the difference between "Twin bed" and "Double bed"
4 votes

A double bed is a bed large enough for two adults. The word "double" refers to the number of occupants. A bed described as "double" in an advertisement will probably be 54 inches wide, a size also ...

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Which one to use "Does" or "Is"
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4 votes

You cannot use "do" as a question word with "is". "Do" means to act. The word "do" is used in questions to ask whether the action is being performed or not. While "is" is a verb, it does not describe ...

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What's the meaning of "Old Hob"?
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3 votes

Old Hob is an informal term for Satan. (In English folklore a hob is a spirit.) The speaker means that the pirates will be killed by the gunfire. He presumes that they, being evil men, will go to Hell ...

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Definition for "oral vaccination"
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3 votes

How about something simpler: oral vaccination--the practice of administering vaccine by mouth (rather than by injection)

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What does "I never know" mean?
3 votes

Here the word "never" indicates a recurring problem. The problem is that "stalactite" and "stalagmite" are similar-sounding words of Greek origin. Because they are foreign, Harry cannot identify their ...

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Questions about "from whose known good sense he fully expected to have just such" from "Persuasion"
3 votes

I think that "from whose known good sense he fully expected" means that his expectation was based on Lady Russell's reputation for good judgement. But is also possible that Austin means that the ideas ...

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Can "historical background" refer to historical information irrelevant to the topic?
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2 votes

One of the meanings of background is "information essential to understanding of a problem or situation" Merriam-Webster. At the very least background is "the circumstances or events ...

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Does "feeling hurt" always imply "hurt by someone"?
2 votes

I agree with @LinShao's answer but would like to elaborate. In the expression "to feel hurt" the word "hurt" refers to emotional pain, to pain in one's heart. It does not mean &...

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Plurals: "As matters of fact", "As matter of facts", and "As matters of facts" which one(s) when? if any?
2 votes

In almost all cases you would say "As a matter of fact." Here the word "matter" refers to a single question: what did A and B do. Since this is only one question, it is singular. ...

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What does "give-back" mean in court context?
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2 votes

It is informal speech. To give something back means to return it after receiving it. Here "give-back" is a verb phrase converted to a noun by putting a hyphen between the words. It means &...

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What is the difference between social network and social networking?
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2 votes

Nouns ending in -ing refer to activities. Social networking is what one is doing when one is using a social network.

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Why does the author say the information was "correct" but after that he says "the information was wrong"?
2 votes

The word "correct" can convey the idea of "neat and straight", of conformance to some kind of norm or pattern. For example, a world is spelled correctly if it is spelled as given in dictionaries. A ...

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What does 'pull at the nails' mean here?
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2 votes

To pull at something generally means to take hold of something and repeatedly pull on it. For example: He pulled at his ear thoughtfully. This usage here seems a little unusual to me, but the ...

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What does it mean “No large part of America has ever been entirely off-limits to judicial authority”
2 votes

The statement is not about the physical territory of the United States. It is about parts of American life. There are "private spaces" which enjoy legal protection. For example, the home is normally "...

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What does "will something to do but don't want" mean?
Accepted answer
2 votes

The word is "willing", not "will". A person who is merely willing consents to engage in some activity, likely to please someone else and perhaps even reluctantly. A person who "wants to do" something ...

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