JayHook
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Should I say "I will be using" or "I am using" in conditional sentence?
7 votes

If I am in Figi next week, I will use my scuba diving gear. This sentence meets the grammatical requirement of First Conditional. Source: EnglishClub | First Conditional: real possibility.

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Do we always use a verb word after 'make'?
5 votes

What you are asking is one of many usages of 'make' in a sentence. I will make your stay comfortable. I will make your stay possible. As you can see the verb, make, is followed by an object and ...

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Which preposition: "on", "at" or "in"?
3 votes

According to Oxford Advanced Learners Dictionary: 1 [countable] a particular time when something happens on this/that occasion I've met him on several occasions. They have been seen together on ...

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a specific usage of "of"
3 votes

Since the original poster asked the usage of of, the right answer is that it is used in apposition with of-phrase. the fool of a policeman an angel of a girl this jewel of an island This structure ...

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adjective applied to several noun
3 votes

According to Collins Cobuild English Grammar, you use only one adjective. The following is a statement directly quoted from the grammar. When you are linking two nouns, an adjective in front of the ...

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In Tales of Count Lucanor, what's 'that' in 'that which'?
Accepted answer
2 votes

Michael Swan, author of Practical English Usage (1995), considers that which to be an older form of what. In fact, he says that the form that which is very unusual in modern English. However, a search ...

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Send me a picture of hers vs Send me a picture of her? Send me a picture of him vs send me a picure of his?
2 votes

A picture of her means a picture in which she is shown and it does not say anything about who owns it. On the other hand, a picture of hers means a picture she owns, but it does not say who is in it.

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would rather eat or ate?
2 votes

I believe you asked about a special use of would rather. Without trying to explain the grammar point on my own, I will let you read what the author says about this special usage.

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present perfect vs past perfect vs simple past
2 votes

The dancers have rehearsed the ballet for almost three hours. This is correct. The dancers had rehearsed the ballet for almost three hours when I saw them. You don't use the past perfect tense ...

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When you hear 'sound out', don't you picture percussion activities?
2 votes

In the context of the sentence in OP's question, I think the following definition is better suited. sound somebody/something ↔ out phrasal verb to talk to someone in order to find out what they ...

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What does "a priori" mean?
Accepted answer
2 votes

Please refer to the Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English: Or to the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary:

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How often do you use "can('t) have done" structure?
Accepted answer
2 votes

He must have been at the meeting. We use this modal to express logical deduction in an affirmative sense. I am quite certain that he was at the meeting He can't have been at the meeting. This ...

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Which kind of stay is author referring to?
Accepted answer
2 votes

The author may be saying that the visitor will associate the shape with the mood he or she is in. Peanuts are often consumed while a person drinks. A newly married person may think of being pregnant. ...

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Is this as a relative pronoun?
Accepted answer
2 votes

I agree with you that 'as' in question is a relative pronoun. > 6 formal used to refer only to people or things of a particular group or kind such ... as/who/that Such individuals who take up ...

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You were part coach, part administrator -- no articles?
1 votes

According to the entries in three dictionaries as below, the word, part. is used as an adverb. ESL learners have to make themselves familiar with its use.

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"Until now" ambiguity
1 votes

Although the use of until now appears redundant and unnecessary, the phrase is apparently used so often that it is listed in a reputable dictionary.

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Is the word "thing" necessary in the following sentence?
1 votes

The closest stands for the closest information. Instead of repeating the word, information, we use the superlatives as pronouns in place of the closest information.

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What does "on the go" mean?
Accepted answer
1 votes

I think "on-the-go learning" is similar to "on-the-job learning" in the context of the OP's quoted sentence. You learn something while you are doing the job or while you are on your way to some place. ...

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"a" in "(a) short/long time"
1 votes

I copied and pasted a portion of the entry in Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary. It says that 'a time' means a period of time.

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What's the difference complementizing between with gerund-participle and to-infinitive?
Accepted answer
1 votes

and they were a bit late arriving at Hagrid's hut because . . 'arriving..' here starts a participle clause to describe an event simultaneous with 'were a bit late'. and they were a bit late as ...

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What does “his healthy home already healthy” mean in this context?
1 votes

Nothing would make a weary traveler’s heart beat a little faster than the luxury of arriving at his healthy home (being) already being healthy, especially with that built-in juicing station, and a 78-...

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Can the Past Continuous be used for future events?
1 votes

That day I started new life. I was taking Spanish classes next week. There are at least 2 problems with the above sentence. We use 'next week' to mean the week after this week and therefore it is ...

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What does 'what sticks' mean?
1 votes

If you throw multiple pieces of mud at a wall one at a time, some will stick to the wall while others won't. If you post something multiple times one at a time, some will attract someones' attention ...

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Truman's use of 'become' in 'it becomes my duty' ? (1951 US)
0 votes

The subject 'it' refers forward to a 'to'-infinitive clause or a finite subordinate clause It costs so much to get there. It becomes my duty to replace you as Supreme Commander. It was amazing ...

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one of the more fascinating
0 votes

Václav Havel was one of the more fascinating politicians of the last century. I would look at the phrase in question in the following way. one of the politicians of the last century We need to use ...

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Should in conditional sentences
0 votes

The following sentences are type 1 (first) conditional. If he should call, tell him I will ring back. If I should see him, I'll ask him to ring you.

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Should there be a comma before ‘too’ in: "Me too"?
0 votes

The following examples are from Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English. None of them has a comma before too. There were people from all over Europe, and America too. Can I come too? ‘I’...

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"waterway ... flowed sombre" - Should Joseph Conrad have used an adverb, not an adjective?
0 votes

The word in question is part of a participle clause. , and the tranquil waterway leading to the uttermost ends of the earth flowed (being) sombre under an overcast sky – I can convert it to a ...

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Like I am / were a different person
0 votes

I would replace 'like' with 'as if' in both sentences because the latter is more tranditional and therefore grammatical. She looks at me as if I am a different person. She looks at me as if I ...

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Can any sentence using the present perfect tense be rewritten without using it without changing its meaning?
-1 votes

I've just gotten this video game. I just got this video game. The above two sentences are interchangeable. Have you ever been to China? This means that you ever visited China and you are back ...

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