lonehorseend
  • Member for 8 years, 6 months
  • Last seen more than 7 years ago
Do we "transfer" our experiences?
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6 votes

"Shared" is actually more common in English. Also, though you have many experiences, you are talking about them as a group when you share them with someone, so you would use the singular form of "...

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Diffrence in between "indeed," "obviously," and "of course"
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5 votes

They are used for emphasis. Let's say you and I are in a room that is blue and I say "the room is blue." Your response would be: "Obviously, the room is blue." - I stated something we both could see ...

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Question and a sentence in the same sentence
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3 votes

To formalize what StoneyB said, computerized grammar checkers are only meant as guides because they don't know context, they only know rules. You really need a human editor or a place like this to ...

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What is the difference between "accept" and "except"?
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2 votes

Except and accept are pronounced in the same way, but their definitions are definitely different. Except is used when something doesn't follow a pattern. For example: The bank closes at 5, ...

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Is America "it" or "she"?
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2 votes

Either is correct. If you want to follow political correctness, which is trying to make everything gender-neutral, then it will do; if you want to follow tradition, then she. Yahoo! Answers had an ...

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Hole or Edge or gap
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2 votes

At first, I thought it was what CopperKettle said, a crack or a crevice then I did a little research on Google and came up with the correct term, pocket. According to an about.com article, it's one ...

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When saved as html
2 votes

If you are describing a process you always want to keep it third person. In other words, no I or you. When saving as HTML, make sure to check the box that says . . . is an example of instruction ...

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an object or some objects
2 votes

I like this the best: We use the symbol c[t1] henceforth, where c is a speed function and t1 is a speed parameter for any object obj1. However I think it sounds better as this: We use the ...

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What does "play our way" mean?
1 votes

It's all about context. In this case, play our way does mean make our way, but that's because they are dealing with a living chessboard. The only other time it would make sense to substitute "play our ...

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at the age of... vs. at an age of
1 votes

It depends on context. General rule of thumb, though, is the is definite, meaning, an event happened exactly when that person was that age. Usually, it's for a single person. An is more generalized, ...

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I'd just as soon…as to
1 votes

Does the following sentence mean I prefer to go home, or something is just as fine as something else? Yes, I'd just as soon go home means you prefer going home. Does this other sentence mean that ...

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Does "In the room is cool." make sense?
1 votes

If that's a complete sentence, then no. There is no sense of who or what is being talked about. Now, if it said "Everyone in the room is cool" then that's a perfectly good sentence. Or if you are ...

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Banner Location or Banner Position
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1 votes

Using http://www.quirks.com/advertise/online/web_ads.aspx as an example, you'll see that both location and position are used in describing how ads will be placed. As a designer, my instinct is to go ...

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Why doesn't this clause have perfect tense?
1 votes

As he called for more wine = as he drank more wine. The sentence works as is because it is relaying the passage of time instead of stating a cause and effect.

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how can we use "literally"?
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0 votes

Dictionary.com actually gives a very good description of what happened to the word literally and why there is confusion in it's definition and usage: Since the early 20th century, literally has ...

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"Something to forget" versus "something to be forgotten"
0 votes

It's the voice of the sentences. In both cases, the "to be" turns the sentence from active to passive. You can read more about the passive voice at http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/passive-...

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Basing or Based?
-1 votes

It's "Many companies judge students based on their teachers' references," because you don't have any tense confusion. The companies are judging the students because of the references their teachers ...

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