Muzer
  • Member for 6 years, 6 months
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Is it correct to say "I'm understandable of..."?
1 votes

To add to Henning's excellent answer, if you really wanted to use the "I'm X of that" construction, I can think of three words that will fit in place of X there: I'm aware of that This one ...

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AS sentence differences
1 votes

The literal difference between these sentences is simply one of time limiting. "What was the most painful experience you have ever experienced as a mother" would be "from the time you became a mother ...

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weren't going vs didn't go
3 votes

Your "didn't go north" example, as it stands, to me implies that your trip was completely cancelled. You were perhaps considering going north on that day, but the bad weather meant you didn't go north ...

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What is the difference between "I still use" vs "I am still using" in this sentence?
46 votes

With the "It's 2018" clause, both mean more or less the same thing (as Neil says). But without that clause to clarify, the implication would be quite different. I still use this phone would be ...

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2 for 5 (bucks) vs 5 (bucks) for 2
1 votes

For whatever reason, when using the "X for Y" idiom, the thing that you (as a consumer) gets is usually specified first. I think it's because the longer form of the phrase would be something like "Get ...

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Difference between walk-in order and walk up to order
2 votes

Maybe this should be a comment rather than an answer, but I thought I'd add this similar but not quite related usage. Not related to the food industry, but I've often heard walk-up used in transport ...

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What is the word for this type of shade mixed with spots of sunlight?
1 votes

I really like the answer given by Max, but if you are looking for a less poetic expression with a greater likelihood of comprehension (I feel there might be a few people who might not understand "...

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Will you be having cake?
4 votes

I'll give you an analysis of how each one sounds to me (a 20-something Brit) Will you be having cake? Yes, thank you. Polite way of accepting cake. Yes, I will. Probably ...

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Meaning of "for your record"
Accepted answer
3 votes

Basically just "for you to keep in case you need to refer to it" — some people might like to keep a copy of something they've signed in case they need to reread it later.

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