2017
Sep
9
awarded  Yearling
2016
Sep
9
awarded  Yearling
Feb
22
awarded  Necromancer
2015
Sep
9
awarded  Yearling
Aug
30
awarded  Caucus
2014
Sep
9
awarded  Yearling
May
1
answered What does the phrase “I wish I could meet you so bad” mean?
Apr
30
comment A saying for “we are old when we begin to often think about the past”?
@DamkerngT. to which the usual (rather risque) reply is usually "No, a man is as old as the woman he feels!"
Apr
29
comment Is there an English word for non-monarchic empire?
The word Commonwealth is in everyday use and not at all archaic. Commonwealth is part of the official name of Australia, which was indeed formed from a collection of colonies. australia.gov.au/about-australia/our-government. The Commonwealth is also a political association of some 53 countries, mostly but not exclusively former members of the British Empire thecommonwealth.org/member-countries. This year in Glasgow will be the XXth Commonwealth Games glasgow2014.com.
Apr
28
comment Is the phrase “have enabled to” correct?
Perhaps the underlying sense is "We have made it possible to express..."
Apr
24
comment Shouldn't it be 'Scheduled for Demolition' and not 'Under Demolition''?
This door is somewhat perturbed
Apr
24
comment Why use “reds and oranges” not “red and orange”?
Unless of course you are shopping for paint, in which case there are 57 varieties of white :-)
Apr
23
comment Is “you think” a parenthesis ? Or it is a subject and a predicate of a object clause which in an attributive clause?
My parsing is: "If you are prepared for [X], you are ready for [X]" X=[something that you think is going to happen] The second X is replaced by its pronoun, "it". How you then analyse the "you think" part is beyond my technical knowledge but I'm pretty sure it's not parenthetical.
Apr
23
comment When making a presentation, do I use “slides” or “foils”?
I used acetates a-plenty for overhead projectors in the pre-Powerpoint era (and even in the early Powerpoint years as a backup). I always referred to them as slides. (BrE). At school, back in the 1970s, some teachers used rolls of clear film mounted on an OHP, and would just crank the handle to scroll to fresh space as they filled up the page. I think they may have been referred to as foils - I'm not quite sure.
Apr
22
awarded  Critic
Apr
22
comment The nuance of 'young' and 'younger' in this context
I am not being prickly in pointing out that your catch-all use of "native English speakers" is simply wrong. I don't care what's in Swan's book - that isn't relevant to the point. If something sounds odd to an American, then say so. Many of the people using this site come from or do business with other parts of the world, and in that context US speakers of English are a minority. Edit: I see you've edited your answer to add "American". Thank you.
Apr
22
comment The nuance of 'young' and 'younger' in this context
Who said anything about American English? My very point is that English exists outside Texas/US, and I can assure you that "I don't do much sport" is absolutely normal and colloquial in the UK, Australia, New Zealand and probably elsewhere too. So I bristle at your claim that it makes "very little sense to native English speakers". It is you who are doing this site's readers a disservice by ignoring the world outside Texas.
Apr
22
comment The nuance of 'young' and 'younger' in this context
I don't do much sport now makes perfect sense to me and sounds comfortably colloquial. You should not equate Texas with the universe of native English speakers. It's not that big.
Apr
21
answered Future Simple and Future Perfect
Apr
21
awarded  Enthusiast