corsiKa
  • Member for 8 years, 11 months
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Is "This brought me an idea" correct English?
10 votes

If you were going to use brought (which would make sense if the this you're referring to didn't immediately give you the idea, but rather led you through a series of logical steps that resulted in the ...

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An idiomatic word for "very little" in this context?
3 votes

Insignificant While this word doesn't fit every context, when comparing a slice of some larger total insignificant seems the most appropriate word. A more day-to-day example would be a vacation ...

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What is the difference between "do you like" and "would you like"?
3 votes

The other answers are not incorrect. They are technically correct, which is the best kind of correct. However, there are cases that can blur the lines between the two. Consider the following ...

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The issue with construction : make + noun
1 votes

It sounds like you're looking for alternative definitions of make. Dictionary.com defines make with a couple definitions that apply to yours: to cause to be or become; render: to make someone ...

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Looking for a word - prince's clothes
1 votes

If you're looking for a catch-all for what the prince is wearing, consider attire. The prince's attire was befitting a man of his station. If you're trying to find what clothes the prince was wearing,...

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"All languages are interesting." "Every language is interesting." Do they mean exactly the same thing?
1 votes

The two sentences can mean the same thing, or they could mean different things. It depends on the context. Instead of languages, though, I'm going to use candles. You'll see why in a minute. Consider ...

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What is the difference between robbing and stealing?
1 votes

You tend to steal specific things during a robbery. You steal a car. You steal The Constitution. You steal the lady's heart. Stealing is an act performed on the things you steal. Robbery is an act you ...

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We can say really big, and it makes the thing we're talking about bigger than the usual big. Is there a way of saying not so big?
1 votes

Maybe it's just where I've been (Michigan, Oregon, Alberta) but I would consider "not-so-big" to be smaller than just "big". Personally, I would use "rather" or perhaps "kind of". He's rather big....

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cut-out-and-keep -- meaning?
Accepted answer
0 votes

It means the mini-site is one that you can cut out and then keep. As opposed to looking it up all the time, you could simply pin this up on the wall by your computer so you always have the template ...

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"As (a) programmer, I'm responsible for.." - When to use the indefinite article?
-2 votes

Either is acceptable. Consider the following scenario, on a boat. Sailor: Should we pursue the enemy ship? Or head to base for repairs. Captain: As captain, I have a duty to protect my crew. ...

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