oerkelens
  • Member for 8 years, 3 months
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The meaning of "As if on cue"
7 votes

I don't see why your derived meaning (which seems correct) cannot be applied to the first sentence. Of course, without further context, this is always a guessing game, but let's add some context and ...

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Can "speech" mean a physical paper of a speech?
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7 votes

I am surprised that oxford online would only list the written use of speech for a play, and the merriam webster seems to list no written versions at all. It is very common to use the word speech not ...

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What is the taste of an unripened date or plum?
7 votes

What you describe seems to be what wine-tasters know as tannin, the taste of which may be described as tannic. The specific effect is described in tea as astringency: Tannins give tea astringency, ...

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Difference between "why" and "what for"?
7 votes

Why asks about a reason, what for about a purpose. The distinction is not always clear, but a reason is the cause of something, and a purpose is the result of something. Why are you wet? Because ...

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Hypernym for "input" and "output"
7 votes

I would actually think of the commonly used input/output, or I/O . Transput may be recognized by some, but I can assure you that plenty of people will not immediately grasp its meaning. I do admit ...

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"talk money" or "talk about money"
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7 votes

The verb "to talk" can be used idiomatically as a transitive verb, but usually with a limited number of nouns that can serve as a direct object. Let's talk business. Let's talk money. If ...

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What's the word for prejudicing, stereotyping or discrimination against men?
7 votes

Sexism is I think the correct term, for the simple reason that it refers to discrimination based on sex. Yes, it has in the past been predominantly used when referring to discrimination against women,...

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Pronunciation of "chase"
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6 votes

Is there a reason? Yes, there is. First of all, there are no rules that tell you how to pronounce an English word, based on its spelling. Let me repeat that: There are no rules that tell you how to ...

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What's the difference between "prime", "primary" and "primal"?
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6 votes

There are certainly differences. What is very confusing is that you found three definitions that all mention "very important", which as such is correct in all three cases, but "very important" can ...

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“Pharaoh was thought he was divine”
6 votes

Well, the problem is that two sentence constructions seem to have been mixed up in that last part of your sentence: The pharaoh thought (that) he was divine. This is simple active voice: the ...

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Is it correct to say, "There is no enough room in the lift (or the elevator)"?
6 votes

for starters, no enough is not correct. You can either say there is no room, or you can say there is not enough room: both are grammatically correct. Depending on the situation, it may or may not ...

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comma / surprising / capitalization
6 votes

Is this correct to use a comma in this situation (for animals and their owners, I have learned...)? Yes. It is quite common to separate a subordinate clause from the main clause with a comma, ...

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In "All valid data bits", what does "valid" refer to?
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6 votes

In general, when you have a noun with a number of attributives (which may include nouns used attributively), the head noun is the last one in the construction, and all attributes refer to that head ...

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Difference between "fathom" and "understand"
6 votes

There are (almost) no sets of words in any language that mean exactly the same in all circumstances. If such a thing happens, usually one word stops being used. The verb fathom is a nice one. If we ...

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pick the nits - what does that expression mean?
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6 votes

The expression is originally that someone is a nitpicker: pedantic critic, 1951; see nit (n.) + pick (v.) Nits are louse eggs (very small things) and someone who picks them is paying (too much) ...

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What does "or you risk" means?
6 votes

Your interpretation seems correct - but you do not get a risk, you run a risk. Which means the same as you risk something. Don't play with guns or you risk getting hurt. Means "if you play with ...

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Which one is correct: "my little brother" or "my smaller brother"?
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6 votes

When you want to be clear that the distinction is about age, the simplest and most obvious choice is, like Shaunak Sukla says: younger brother, older brother However, it is very common to refer to ...

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Meaning and correctness of "he was more understanding of her than of any of the others"
6 votes

He was more understanding of her than of any of the others. The sentence is grammatical, and means that he showed understanding of her, but there are other people involved as well, and he does not ...

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Why there is no definite article?
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6 votes

Shipwrecked on a desert island, coconuts and other fruits formed the basis of the sailors' diet. By saying the other fruits, you imply that either coconuts and all other fruits known to man were ...

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Meaning of "a higher form of war" in The Avengers
6 votes

What that higher form of war means, is even unclear to "Steve". It seems it is meant to be unclear, and maybe "Thor" will get a chance to explain it later on, since "Steve" asks the same question as ...

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Including and excluding "a" in a sentence, both make sense
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6 votes

"many note-taker's heart" sounds grammatically correct. Nope, it does not :) It should, in that case be: many note-takers' hearts The construction many a is possibly a bit archaic and certainly ...

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Confusion about the verb 'welcome'`
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6 votes

"Welcome" can be a verb, and is then used accordingly: I welcome you to my house. I will always welcome her. He welcomed me to his party. But it can also be an adjective: You are welcome in ...

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What is the difference between "three of them" and "the three of them"?
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6 votes

In the first case you are simply counting them, in the second case you are using the group of three people either as an object or subject in a phrase. I collect cars; I have three of them. The ...

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What's the meaning of "in all of creation"?
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6 votes

“All of creation” refers to all of God's creation, i.e. the whole world, the whole Earth. cre·a·tion (krē-ā′shən) n.3.      a. The world and all things in it.  &...

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why this sentence is wrong?
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6 votes

Both are correct, but they may not mean what you intend to say. They almost drove six hundred miles. Means that they intended to get in a car and drive 600 miles, but someone called them and told ...

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What's the meaning of domestic transfer?
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5 votes

You have voices in your bank account? That sounds spooky! ;) I guess you mean an invoice. :) Well, a transfer is the displacement of something from one place to another. You can transfer money from ...

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Age + "years old"
5 votes

In general with times and ages, if a number clearly indicates what it is counting, it is not necessary to include that information. If I say she was just seventeen, you know what I mean (from "I saw ...

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Are longer sentences supposed to be harder to read?
5 votes

I think the mere length of a sentence is only a small part of what determines how readily it's understood. Vocabulary, syntax, and, most important, contemporary grammaticality are also important. ...

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Want to understand "the Duchess of Cambridge was safely delivered of a daughter" further
5 votes

Although in everyday speech, we have little problem with saying that a woman delivered a baby, in (very) formal contexts, and (very) formal and traditional environments, things are different. Now, ...

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"expired" vs "is expired"
5 votes

Unless you are writing headlines, you need to include a definite article before deadline. Then all three options you mentioned can be correct, it is simply a matter of which tense you mean to use (...

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