ghostarbeiter
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What's the meaning of 'the eventual repair of ecosystems' in this context?
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Some European languages have cognate words with a slightly different meaning, like the French adjective éventuel and adverb éventuellement. This is something that might happen in the future, ...

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Michael is a New Zealander or Michael is New Zealander? Article before nationalities?
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16 votes

You could say "Michael is German", however "German" in this sentence is interpreted as an adjective, not a noun. It would also be correct grammatically to say "Michael is a German", although this is ...

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(The) Soup Of The Day
1 votes

Whether or not to capitalize certain words in a title is a matter of style, rather than an absolute rule of the English language. That is, different experts may have different opinions, and different ...

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The word "Rather", its meaning and usage
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The meaning of "rather" in this sentence could be covered by definitions 4 or 7 of dictionary.com: sooner; more readily or willingly instead of or wordreference.com (Random House), definitions 3 or ...

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someone who fails to pay when it's due and the opposite of it
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3 votes

A habitual or long-term defaulter might be called a deadbeat. This is especially used, for instance, for someone who fails to fulfill financial obligations other than loans, such as child support ...

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"Remnants" vs "remains"
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2 votes

The term "remains" is specifically used for dead human bodies, and especially when the bodies are not intact and there are only body parts (possibly from more than one body) rather than intact corpses ...

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"the set of the day" & "that was my line"
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"set" and "line" seem to be slang specifically associated with surfing and snowboarding, respectively. From context we can guess that "set" refers to a wave and that "line" refers to the path taken ...

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Put your hands "in" or "into" your pockets?
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The word "in" can mean: "inside" (unchanging position) "into" (changing position from outside to inside) Put your hands in your pockets = Put your hands into your pockets Your hands are now in your ...

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What is the English name of 'Santol'?
1 votes

See the Wikipedia article. A simple Google search for "santol" finds this page. According to Wikipedia the local name in Nigeria is "udara". It has been introduced to India, but the article does not ...

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How to use the expression "throw oneself into something"
2 votes

Yes, "to throw oneself into" is a standard idiom. cambridge.org: to do something ​actively and ​enthusiastically thefreedictionary.com: to enter into or join something eagerly and wholeheartedly ...

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Meaning of "lifting the front trench clean out of it"
1 votes

The meaning is not entirely clear. To me it suggests artillery shells landing and destroying the front trench, exploding and throwing ("lifting") earth and soil upward into the air. It is also ...

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Does the English language have a grammatical gender?
5 votes

In the World Atlas of Language Structures, English is listed as having three genders, just like German and Russian. However it is only present in third-person singular pronouns, and male or female ...

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