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The meaning of "through your benches coming alongside"
1 votes

A "pig of ballast" was a piece of iron or lead weighing a hundred pounds or more; many of these were carried in the lower part of a ship's hull as ballast to improve her stability. Baeticus uses ...

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Question of verb agreement with complex subject
0 votes

TECHNICAL SUPPLEMENT to James K's answer This is not a "complex subject". As well as, in formal use, does not act as a coordinating conjunction†; it's more or less equivalent to in addition to....

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What does it refer to in the passage?
2 votes

This it is a sort of 'generic' or 'universal' pronoun referring to the entire context of the current discussion: "Think about everything we've just said." And the entire sentence is a 'discourse ...

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why do we use smell and not smells in this particular phrase?
5 votes

When "make" is used in the causative sense (="cause or compel [X to happen]") it takes an unmarked infinitival clause as its complement: that is, a clause headed by a verb in its infinitive form, ...

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The meaning of "to have the rudders down directly"
1 votes

Roman-era vessels did not have true rudders, but steering oars mounted on the vessel's flanks. These (like driving oars) could be raised out of the water when they were not needed; and in fact they ...

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bespeak of my heart / bespeak my heart
1 votes

In EModE, as in ModE, imperatives employed the plain form, and might include the subject in the next position. Questions might invert ordinary verbs and not just auxiliaries. Ah, my Darling, my ...

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Author of two previous novels, his third…
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14 votes

Your bolded text is not a clause but a noun phrase, which should be set in apposition to another noun phrase, its "predicand", which it describes. Usually the predicand is the noun phrase which ...

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...putting us and the rest of the world on so
1 votes

Parse this as putting on with so="in this manner" or "to this degree" as a modifier. Put on here is extended from the metaphor of "donning" a disguise or false identity to mean "deceive" or "trick". ...

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What's the meaning of "register hits"
5 votes

This is a great example of why we ask for context. In this case the preceding lines in the show make it clear what "hits" means: I ran the tags on the screen caps of the buses that you sent me. ...

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Proper use of verb GRANT
1 votes

With to (grant something to somebody) the preposition phrase is a complement of the verb: to somebody designates the recipient of the grant. There are several ways of analyzing the sentence you quote;...

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Difference between "had to be, and "had to have been"?
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2 votes

Although Wilson's supporters were certainly implying that "There is a way to avoid war" (videlicet, by re-electing Wilson), that isn't what they were actually saying. The slogan the speaker quotes, "...

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Is a group of letters a sentence?
1 votes

A random group of letters might spell a sentence, just as a random group of bricks might constitute a house; but both are very unlikely. What exactly a "sentence" is is controversial and will depend ...

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On using "such probability"
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1 votes

Either of these is grammatically fine. In this context, however, I don't think I'd use such at all. You're not speaking about a probability like that one, which is what such implies—you're ...

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What was your name vs. What is your name?
4 votes

The past form is often used tentatively, like this, to 'push the reset button' on an earlier situation or topic. In your case, the rep is probably trained to give customers freedom to express their ...

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subjunctife or infinitive what is the difference?
1 votes

There is no substantial difference in meaning. The difference in 'politeness' is a matter of making your preference less demanding with a construction that emphasizes its tentative or hypothetical ...

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What does "switch off" mean exactly in this sentence?
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14 votes

When music was playing on a stereo or in the garage, she could tune it out or switch it off . . . Switch off is used literally to designate turning or flipping a switch to end the functioning of a ...

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The sentence structure analysis
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1 votes

18th-century punctuation tended to be rhetorical rather than syntactical, and the exclamation point marks only Hume's emphasis on the preceding noun phrase, not a full stop. This is still common in ...

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What does "a quick conception of all" mean?
2 votes

Her "quick conception" (which you are right in understanding as an "immediate thought") is not about her lack of racial characteristics but about "all that this accusation meant for her"—that is,...

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Is the word "saying" a gerund in these lyrics?
0 votes

Saying is not a gerund† here: it does not head a clause playing the role of a noun phrase. The clause saying you were the one that could finally fix me is probably best understood as a ...

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Type of usage in these examples?
1 votes

These are all noun phrases, headed respectively by feeling, me, and salesman. Everything else in them is either a determiner (that, ∅†, a) or a clausal modifier of the head: a reduced relative ...

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Usage of "whomever" in "whomever produces a more interesting result is the winner"
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6 votes

You are quite right, and for the right reason: whoever is called for here, because it stands for the subject of its clause. Whomever in your examples is probably a hypercorrection—that is, a ...

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It already exists OR it is already existing before
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4 votes

Neither of your sentences is idiomatic. Call it that way is not an English construction. We say "called it that" or "gave it that name" or "used that name for it". And in this case it's a little ...

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Does a native speaker say "recharge oneself"?
13 votes

Recharge myself is not a phrase I've ever encountered, but it's a nifty metaphor. However, I would take it to mean "do things to get myself more motivated and energetic": I need to take a vacation ...

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Is “I believe to” in this sentence correct?
3 votes

He is the man I believe to deserve that title. or He is the man I believe deserves that title. These are both entirely proper. They are restrictive relative clauses from which the relativizer whom ...

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The sentence's object? (pains or Bummer Baskets?)
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17 votes

This is a slovenly sentence which leaves it to the reader to figure out from context how the parts hang together. What the author probably means is that the range of care packages is dominated by the ...

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Do you want to go (to the) father? (preposition + article addition)
3 votes

Dropping the preposition to (not the infinitive marker to before go) leaves the reader/hearer no clue as to what role father plays in the sentence. In fact, it looks like father is a verb (as in "Do ...

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which of the two mean that the person is not worthy enough that a biopic should be made on his life?
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2 votes

A narrative is "about" its subject/topic, not "on" it. Enough is redundant in this context. Worthy is pretty much confined to non-colloquial registers these days, so I wouldn't pair it with the ...

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Adding -s or -ed at the end of verb
1 votes

This is an infinitive (signalled by the infinitive marker to), so it does not take any inflectional suffix for person or tense. However, we do not say that someone or something injures to mean that ...

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What does the phrase 'physics defying action' mean?
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2 votes

Physics defying action (as Tetsujin says, this is more properly written physics-defying) is action which defies physics: that is, it does not obey the laws of real-world physics. Exaggerated captures ...

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Reduction of conditional adverb clauses
2 votes

This is a complete sentence; I assume what you're looking for is a version with the references made explicit. From the context we readily understand that This refers to kidnapping her, and that ...

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