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Is this sentence correct in terms of structure: "By the time we get to school, we have been speaking a few years."
1 votes

This type of sentence, when speaking of something yet to happen, would employ the future perfect - By the time I finish my work, the rest of the staff will have gone home. However, where we are ...

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have to be careful
3 votes

Yes careful like vast numbers of words in English has different senses in which it is used. If I say "You must be careful to switch off the gas", it means that it is unsafe to leave it ...

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How to understand the structure of "To the rescue has come the European Union"?
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5 votes

In English it is perfectly normal for sentences to be structured both with the subject at the front, followed by the predicate and vice-versa - eg: Fred went to London means the same thing as To ...

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She's been banned from tennis for five years
23 votes

Both sentences are grammatically correct. Though neither provides a clear statement of the entire position. It really depends on the context in which you are speaking. If someone for example asks for ...

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Can we use "knowing" as an adjective, just like "all-knowing"?
0 votes

Knowing exists as an adjective to describe both god and mortals. The OED has an extensive entry on the adjective knowing, across several senses. The ones that are not marked obsolete or rare are ...

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When asking if someone agrees or not with one word, do you say "agreed" or "agree"?
0 votes

In a formal situation, such as a meeting, when signifying one's agreement to something, it is usual to say "agreed". Though if one is simply responding to something someone has said "I ...

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Do we need "to be" when applying the rule of reduced relative clause?
1 votes

The two examples you give are both grammatical and idiomatic. It is perfectly normal to leave out the "who was", "who is" and/or "to be". However the general rule about ...

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How to put the modal verb "may" into the correct tense?
0 votes

May is a highly irregular verb, and unlike other verbal auxilliaries such as be, have etc it does not have a conjugated past tense, nor participles. And as @Shoe demonstrates the answer divides ...

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I don't know why "speaking" was used in this sentence
1 votes

I think you have just cause to query this. "Speaking" in that place is not only unnecessary - it is confusing. It is saying ...Trump speaking a day after...held a news conference. "...

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In which tense to use the verb "rent"?
Accepted answer
2 votes

If it is a current tenancy then either "he is renting..." or "he rents..." are fine. If you say "Charles rented out a room...* it would suggest that the rental has ceased, but: you need to be a ...

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"chew on the ball" and "chew the ball" - are they different?
2 votes

If I "chew on a sandwich" there is no clarity that I finished it. e.g He chewed on the sandwich, decided that it tasted awful, and threw it in the bin. However if I am found "chewing a sandwich" then ...

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"hear him tell" vs. "hear him tells"
3 votes

The first is correct. "Tell" is in the infinitive mood. And you are effectively saying: Now let's hear Marco (to) tell his story, except that idiomatically the to is elided. Your second example ...

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Comparative after or before the noun
1 votes

Everything's fine with the position of the adjective. But "hair", a non-count noun, does not take an article. Hence: I have good hair. I have hair better than his. I have better hair than his/him. ...

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Sentence Structure - "I'm seeing very few people roam or roaming..."
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3 votes

To begin with you don't need the "in" in either of them. One "roams the streets", not "in them". Strictly "roaming" - present participle fits with the present continuous main verb "I'm seeing". But "...

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Called as vs known as
1 votes

In this context "called" means the same thing as "known as". But if you used "called" you do not add "as". "Mango is called the king of fruits". "Mango is known as the king of fruits".

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Alarm go off vs alarm goes off
Accepted answer
1 votes

The first is correct. The reason it is "go" and not "goes" is because it is the infinitive use of the verb. I came this way when I heard an alarm (to) go off. You could also use, with little ...

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Past Continuous with Present Perfect
0 votes

I see nothing whatever wrong with it, except that I feel an urge to add a word like "now" or "but" before "I have finished it". If you use "but" it replaces "and". "And" by itself suggests a ...

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Definite article after "of"
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2 votes

The words "every" and "each" are replacing the article. Other adjectival pronouns could be used e.g. "that", "my", "his" etc. - all of which would obviate the need for an article.

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Who (broke / has broken) the glass?
3 votes

In these circumstances "Who broke the glass?" would be the more usual. As it had clearly happened recently in time, since the mother was last there, and it was reasonably clear that it must have been ...

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Why there is no indefinite article in this case?
2 votes

*The noun cake is both countable and non-countable.* "A cake" can be a large cake which is cut into pieces, and served simply as cake (non countable), or sometimes as pieces of cake (countable).Would ...

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What is the right sentence to tell others my wife already delivered a baby
-2 votes

This is a highly pertinent question. The verb "to deliver" when related to childbirth is quite complex. Indeed there is a relevant previous question on EL & U namely When did a mother giving birth ...

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Verbs for the word achievements e.g other achievements he ... are (fill ... in)
2 votes

If you must use the noun "achievement" (rather than the verb "achieve") and find yourself in need of a verb to go with it, there are possibilities but all of them sound a little bit awkward. Perform,...

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The difference between the meanings of two sentences
2 votes

I will tell you when he comes, usually means that I will inform you when he has actually arrived. Comes in this case almost always means arrives. I will tell you when he will come usually means that, ...

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Difference between "set as" and "set at"?
Accepted answer
2 votes

The usual idiomatic form is "set at". However there may be circumstances where "as" might be used, especially if one was not wishing to appear too hard and fast about it. You are quite right that "...

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Can I use adjective clauses to describe a whole sentence or clause?
1 votes

The sentence is grammatical as it stands (except it needs a capital letter at the start). It is clear that the clause in bold qualifies "choosing" and not "factors" since the singular verb "is" ...

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Help understanding a sentence extracted from The Economist
1 votes

Whilst there is nothing especially ungrammatical with the sentence, it is, in my view, unnecessarily convoluted, and the precise meaning is a little unclear. I am confused as to whether it means, so ...

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What is the difference between "sort of" and "a little" in spoken English?
4 votes

Sort of (or kind of) come from the notion type of - like an apple is a sort of fruit, a cauliflower is a kind of vegetable. The terms sort of, and kind of are applied metaphorically to lots of ...

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Build vs Construct
3 votes

For me, a British person, build is associated with everyday items such as houses, roads, bridges, office buildings etc. The word construct, to me suggests a requirement for an element of ingenuity. ...

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Is "motivate people's willingness" grammatically correct?
32 votes

You are right that sentence 2 is better, since it is people not willingness which the site is attempting to motivate. Even so, I think it is still too verbose. The words motivation and willingness ...

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I am curious about Why usage in the following sentences
Accepted answer
1 votes

The "sentences" you quote are so much part of everyday English, that they could be considered idiomatic. However parts of them, including the main verb (often "is/are*) have been elided. Hence the ...

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