Sam
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5 answers
12 votes
3k views
"Roll Over" in the Song Roll Over Beethoven
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20 votes

From wikipedia The lyric "roll over Beethoven and tell Tchaikovsky the news" refers to how classical composers would roll over in their graves upon hearing that classical music had given ...

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4 answers
12 votes
3k views
What is the meaning of "it" in "as luck would have it"?
9 votes

Consider this example: Question: How will you have your coffee? Black? Answer: I will have it with milk and sugar please. "having something/it" relates to preferences or choices. In the ...

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2 answers
1 votes
1k views
Why is it "half an hour" instead of "a half hour"?
7 votes

"half an hour" is an abbreviation for "half [of] an hour". The phrase "half of" is quite common: "half of the people in the auditorium", "half of the cake", etc. In fact, "half of" is so common ...

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2 answers
6 votes
250 views
Omission of the subject for friendliness?
7 votes

The answer is covered in detail by this stackexchange article, referencing a PhD dissertation.1 This is due to a phenomenon that occurs in intimate conversational spoken English called "...

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1 answers
0 votes
32 views
What is the meaning of "has U.S. president" in the following sentence?
6 votes

has U.S. president. That's a typo. Should read "as U.S. president". What does "at least slightly" mean? It refers to the previous phrase "impeachment talk is in the air&...

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2 answers
0 votes
205 views
What's the meaning of "Not unattractive but getting on"?
6 votes

What's the meaning of "Not unattractive but getting on"? The clue to this mystery is hidden in the following sentence. "Maybe pushing forty." So, the expression "getting on" is an abbreviation for "...

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1 answers
0 votes
55 views
Does "we inform the next week seminars information." sound natural to native English speakers?
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4 votes

Your assumptions are correct. The title isn't natural English. Assumption #1: The phrase next week seminar seems to be unnatural. Right. NEXT WEEK'S SEMINARS This is explained on grammar websites ...

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2 answers
0 votes
56 views
Is it correct to say: "Last year we had an exhibition that showcase how the town square has changed over the past fifty years."
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4 votes

The correct choice is "showcased" rather than "showcase". the transcript says "showcased". the woman says "showcased". the word expected by a fluent listener ...

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1 answers
1 votes
54 views
behind or ahead?
4 votes

The quote seems to be in error, until you check a dictionary: "8. (archaic) Not yet brought forward, produced, or exhibited to view; out of sight; remaining." "Yet to be revealed", ...

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1 answers
0 votes
120 views
how to say that the food is done but not fired
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4 votes

i am cooking eggs and they are about to be "done" or "ready" by done I mean they are eatable and not: "burnt" or "overcooked"

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1 answers
1 votes
6k views
"In addition to" vs "In addition of"
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4 votes

"In addition of" is totally wrong. The preposition (when present) is always "to". However, there are at least two situations where "of" appears next and it is not a ...

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2 answers
2 votes
163 views
Is "each" supposed to refer to a singular subject?
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4 votes

Wrong: They understand the personality of each of their children Not wrong. Correct: They understand the personalities of each of their children Wrong, in the most commonplace sense. It implies ...

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1 answers
0 votes
661 views
'Each student has the same distance to school' is this correct?
4 votes

do you have a better way of saying this? Here are some examples: Each student is the same distance from (the) school. Each student has to walk the same distance to (the) school. Anyway, the ...

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1 answers
0 votes
533 views
Why "housing" is incorrect in this sentence?
4 votes

Why is "housing" incorrect in this sentence? Because the verb "to house" has an active meaning "to put into a house", or "to give shelter to". However the troops were not actively housing someone ...

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2 answers
0 votes
60 views
Is this a mistake of missing preposition?
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4 votes

You are correct, it should be: She wasn’t allowed to go out and play with the other kids.

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1 answers
0 votes
26 views
Construction of clarifying phrases
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3 votes

What you've written makes sense, and does look idiomatic. Here are other examples which come to mind. It's a bit complicated....my life, that is. They got here early....my brothers, I mean.

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3 answers
0 votes
107 views
Do native speakers use prepositions correctly all the time?
3 votes

Native speakers learn language during childhood, and it has been recognized that the brain is especially receptive to language at this time. Consider the complex grammar of Russian and German. Or ...

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1 answers
2 votes
51 views
What's the opposite of wrinkled banknote?
3 votes

The answer, from usingenglish.com: "When paper money is new, it's referred to as being crisp, not all folded and wrinkled."

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1 answers
1 votes
1k views
Can I just say 'there's always a first' omitting 'time for everything'?
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3 votes

"There's a first time for everything" is a standard phrase. "There's always a first time for everything" also makes sense. There are many instances of that text if you do a search. Conversely, "...

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1 answers
1 votes
54 views
Using the verb "write" instead of "denote"
3 votes

"Let us write N for the set of numbers 1,2,3,4..." This looks like standard usage of the words "write" and "for". It makes sense in an ordinary way which doesn't require knowledge of specialized ...

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1 answers
1 votes
136 views
Difference between 'try to do' and 'try doing'
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3 votes

They are both perfectly grammatical sentences, but mean different things. You could try to phone his office. This implies "phoning" might fail. It's like saying "Try to jump over the stream." You ...

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1 answers
3 votes
953 views
Difference between "in time" and "over time"
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3 votes

What is the difference between "in time" and "over time"? Like you mentioned, "in time" and "over time" seem to be synonyms. Of course "in time" has another meaning also, of "meeting a deadline." ...

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1 answers
0 votes
256 views
I been patiently waiting ! Where is have?
3 votes

This question was answered in the comments. IMHO, the following are indeed correct: "It's an ungrammatical / dialectal reduced version of I've been waiting. Don't copy it." – FumbleFingers "You can ...

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2 answers
2 votes
369 views
I did not/had not have a steak until the age of 20 - what tense and why?
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3 votes

I did not have a steak until I was 20. Correct. Or, I didn't have a steak until I was 20. I didn't try steak until I was 20. I didn't eat steak until I was 20 years old. Next, I had not ...

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1 answers
0 votes
182 views
Does it have to be "to lend the money" when say "someone borrowed me money"?
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3 votes

I can only say "Yesterday, XX asked me to borrow my money." This is close to correct, but not exactly. It should be: "Yesterday, XX asked me if he could borrow some money." or maybe "...

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1 answers
-1 votes
39 views
The meaning of the word "to" in context
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3 votes

This means "between a pint and a pint and a half", or could also be written "1–1.5 pints".

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1 answers
0 votes
36 views
Why ‘the’ needed in the phrase "away from the television" in this context?
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3 votes

I don't understand why we need 'the' in that phrase. "The television" is a common expression, just like "the refrigerator" or "the bathtub". Just imagine there is a television in the building. That ...

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2 answers
2 votes
19k views
"Via a phone call" or "with a phone call"?
3 votes

"Via" makes sense, but it does not necessarily sound correct. Here are some alternatives: Please keep in mind that scheduling is best done by phone. For best scheduling, please call by phone. ...

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1 answers
0 votes
199 views
What's the meaning of "I will not allow you to leave school over this"?
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3 votes

collinsdictionary.com, "over", meaning section #3, definition #4: You use over to indicate what a disagreement or feeling relates to or is caused by. The women were making a fuss over nothing. ...

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1 answers
2 votes
1k views
What's more stronger in meaning of "not interesting","dull" or "boring"?
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3 votes

Both "dull" and "boring" have similar levels of intensity. In American English, the more common and typical word is "boring". The problem with saying a teacher is dull, is that it doesn't ...

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