12h
comment In Russian, you can express a dialog without starting a new paragraph each time. Can you do something similar in English?
Don't let an occasional downvote upset or discourage you from asking questions. Sometimes people downvote to "disagree" with the expressed sentiment or something like that. I think this is a good question, but perhaps not suited for ELL. I'd understand if someone downvoted because this isn't really about the English language, but a style detail.
15h
comment In Russian, you can express a dialog without starting a new paragraph each time. Can you do something similar in English?
This isn't about learning English; it's style / writing advice. The problem with what you suggest, of course, is that if you introduce a bit of description in between the replies, and then continue the same person's speech without mentioning their name again (because that's what you now have to do, or at least indicate in text the same person is continuing to speak), no one will know anymore who's talking. The most annoying books I've read have been those where I had to deduce from some hint in the ensuing description whose line that was or, worse, when I had to count lines and start over.
16h
comment what does “ to finish doing something” mean exactly?
I'm done repairing my car can be said (especially if you continue with ...I just can't get it to work) with the opposite meaning, if I'm not mistaken. Would the sentence I've finished working on my car necessarily bear the interpretation laid out in the answer above? If it's possible to continue it with I just can't get it to work, another interpretation is possible.
1d
comment Use of 'of' in “of what a bond that would have been, of how much it would have meant to him”
Is it really normal to say I imagined of how much it would've meant to him? Is this literary usage? I normally hear I imagined how much..., without an of.
1d
answered Question about “in the game” used in this sentence
1d
comment Is 'lay lady lay' grammatical?
Longman labels it as spoken English in this meaning, and says "...some people consider this use to be incorrect".
1d
answered Word for craving a drug
1d
comment Don't use correct grammar topic
Expose yourself to English more by reading books in English, watching movies, etc. Also, find a textbook on English grammar with exercises. Books written by a guy named Murphy are popular.
2d
comment meaning of the word 'off' as in come off, go off, get off, climb off?
I might be mistaken, but go off and climb off don't have any sexual meaning, and neither does the idiom come off (at least not nowadays, I don't think?). Get off is also not exclusively used in this meaning.
Nov
15
comment Do they say 'a vertical of authority' in English (like, from a top boss to a lowest subordinate)?
I'm not a native speaker of English, but chain of command, together with whatever sort of operations may be performed on it (tightening, loosening, strengthening, establishing), sounds perfectly fine to my ears. It's a common phrase in English, really. My conclusion is therefore that you are, will all due respect, out of your depth here when you claim this phrase "sounds translated" to you.
Nov
15
comment Do they say 'a vertical of authority' in English (like, from a top boss to a lowest subordinate)?
@SergeyZolotarev We don't normally do crossword puzzles here, so please refrain from framing your questions / further requests in that direction. In general, a one-to-one correspondence between the source and target languages needn't exist in terms of vocabulary, and the same is true for word count. I don't know if you've noticed, but English, unlike Russian, has articles, and is quite understaffed in the cases department, so in the five-word phrase tighten the chain of command, the definite article is used, as well as of, denoting belonging, neither of which yields extra words in Russian.
Nov
15
comment My question is about names of the institution where in some new words are coined and used?
Oh, you're asking us to label such a coining. Well, I'd just call it a name, haha. They made up a name. This would otherwise be called a compound (and the process compounding) because speak and well are already words in their own right (this isn't a very accurate definition). Also, the words have been concatenated (made into a chain) into a single orthographic unit.
Nov
13
comment The main differences between Simple Past and Present Perfect
Possible duplicate of Canonical Post #2: What is the perfect, and how should I use it?
Nov
13
revised Which sentence/question is right?
edited body
Nov
12
comment What does “the very” expression mean?
See thefreedictionary.com/very and try to find the matching/fitting definition/usage.
Nov
12
comment What does the phrase “edges the fabric” mean here?
I assume it's the second definition of the verb here: "put a border or edge on" or "act as or be an edge of".
Nov
12
comment What is the difference between “This is” and “Here is”?
Can you give us a sentence where you'd like to use one of these?
Nov
12
comment My question is about names of the institution where in some new words are coined and used?
If, as you say, those are names, then it's fine. With names, anything goes. It's not clear what you mean by your last sentence: label such usage as what?
Nov
12
comment What is the difference between “myself vs i myself do.”?
@AIQ I imagined it as a way of saying I'll eat, too, with an emphasis on I. It's similar to the second example. Well, I'll be eating myself, so we might as well do it together.
Nov
12
comment What is the difference between “myself vs i myself do.”?
@AIQ I'm not sure that's the only way to interpret it.