Em.
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Do the British use words like "batso" or "nutso"?
0 votes

The (generally, diminutive) -o suffix occurs in terms like Hey there, kiddo! and He's completely wacko! And it's still slightly "productive" (e.g. - Paxo for broadcaster Jeremy Paxman). But ...

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What does "drink like a professional" mean in this context?
1 votes

Like a professional is a whimsical/facetious usage here. The sense is that he took drinking seriously. He wholeheartedly threw himself into getting drunk quickly (early on means after not much time) ...

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What am I? (If I can only speak and understand a language but can't read and write it)
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3 votes

I don't know that there's a common word for precisely what you describe. But I think conversant is a decent choice, especially if we're talking about a resume. You've cited a definition that kind of ...

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What do you call a chalkboard punishment?
2 votes

(West Coast AmE) I know these as standards, or writing standards (on the chalkboard, on paper, etc). I think doing standards is acceptable, and I've seen copying standards as well. I'm not finding ...

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What is funny about an American joke about the British actor Daniel Day Lewis
2 votes

Note that the skit is called "Buenas Noches with Diego Luca" (Spanish for Good Night/Good Evening) and is supposed to be a parody of a late-night talk shows. I don't think Daniel Day-Lewis ...

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What is the expression for "two people who argue and don't want to talk or see each other any more"?
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2 votes

Not "we hate each other". Hate just suggests that one strongly dislikes another. You can hate someone, but still argue with them face to face, for example. One expression is (to be) not on ...

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Do native speakers use the phrase "set channels"?
34 votes

This usage of channel could roughly be a literal channel (and unclear), or figurative, as in a means of communication (M-W). The idea seems right, but it's not idiomatic. Perhaps, I've gone through ...

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Right phrase for "External Examiner" job position
1 votes

A think a basic term for this is "exam proctor" (AmE). Proctor [...] In the United States and some other countries, the word "proctor" is frequently used to describe someone who ...

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What's the meaning of "he minded another straw"?
3 votes

This is a reference to the well-known idiom the straw that broke the camel's back A seemingly small or inconsequential issue, problem, or burden that proved to be the final catalyst in causing an ...

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Word for the climax of a magic show
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3 votes

From the film, The Prestige Every great magic trick consists of three parts or acts. The first part is called "The Pledge". The magician shows you something ordinary: a deck of cards, a ...

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What is this goodbye hand gesture called?
1 votes

I’ve never actually heard a name for it. Broadly speaking, I would just call this a kind of salute, and, specifically, a two-finger salute. Wikipedia has an entry for this: The two-finger salute is a ...

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How "scratchaway" means "quarrelsome"?
1 votes

No, "scratchaway" does not mean "quarrelsome". The cat names don't really have any meaning in everyday use. But we can attempt to deconstruct them using basic English patterns and ...

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Is "slip of an object" a personification?
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1 votes

I wouldn't say this is personification because we are not giving a human attribute to something nonhuman. Let's look at this entry for slip: slip noun (2) Definition of slip (Entry 3 of 5) 1a : a ...

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"All the beach bodies were sold out"? Can a body be sold?
85 votes

It's just a joke (not meant to be taken literally). I wouldn't really say a beach body is a "hot person on the beach". It's more like a "hot body worthy of showing off at the beach"...

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Meaning of the Top of the Ticket
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1 votes

From Wikipedia: In the United States, political parties nominate one candidate each for President of the United States and for Vice President of the United States. These candidates attempt to win ...

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What's the meaning of 'flirt with' in this news title?
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2 votes

Yes, a no-no is baseball lingo for a no-hitter. This usage of flirt is an idiomatic one that roughly means get close to: flirt 3 : to come close to reaching or experiencing something — used with with ...

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Is there any verb that means "pour water"?
8 votes

Actually, using water seems most natural to me. Were you aware of this usage? Or, is there a reason you are rejecting this? water verb to pour water on to plants or the soil that they are growing in: ...

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What does "turning his flirt" mean here?
0 votes

I also thought this usage of (his) flirt was strange. As you noted, a flirt is typically the person who flirts. After a moment, I thought there were a few interpretations. The first one was that flirt ...

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much to one's despair - meaning?
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2 votes

Regarding the usage of to: to preposition 2 b —used as a function word to indicate the result of an action or a process // broken all to pieces // go to seed // to their surprise, the train left on ...

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What does "Back up" mean in this context?
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0 votes

You say back up when you want to pause a conversation and return to something that was just said. back up 4. verb To return to an item previously mentioned. Whoa, back up—Janet and Jim are getting ...

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What's the joke in Lee's words?
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1 votes

Elle asks Don't you believe in charity? and Marco responds I'm standing here talking to you. You could even tack on a "aren't I?" for a greater emphasis. In other words, he is implying ...

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What's the meaning of independent "as if"?
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0 votes

as if —used to say that something is not true, not possible, will not happen, etc. // "I am sure I am very affectionate," said Dora; "you oughtn't to be cruel to me, Doady!" "...

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Is "handphone" idiomatic?
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2 votes

In AmE, this is not idiomatic. It made me think of a cell phone operated by crank or something ;) I'm not as familiar with BrE, but I imagine it is also not idiomatic in BrE either. We can take a look ...

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"$5 term for a 25 cents concept". Is this an idiom?
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2 votes

Yes, you are on the right track. The expression is used to warn against using a difficult or obscure word (a so-called "big word") when a simple one would suffice. Separately, you can refer ...

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how to say that I can't see from the fog
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2 votes

Smoking produces smoke, or possibly a cloud of smoke. We don't call it fog. To describe smoke that you can't see through, you could call it: thick 6. adjective Thick smoke, fog, or cloud is difficult ...

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Could it be that the word ‘dude’ is insulting?
28 votes

I’m guessing you are referring to the usage as an interjection/exclamation when one is angry or annoyed. dude noun interjection 5 (an expression of shock, approval, sympathy, or other strong feeling)...

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"nuts" and "on one's chin"
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4 votes

"Nuts" is slang for "testicles". He's corrupting everyone's speech to say he's putting his testicles on their chin. It's immature humor. nuts noun [ plural ] offensive for ...

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Is it correct to say "You're sitting sideways in the stroller. Please turn to face forwards / Please turn to face straight ahead"?
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2 votes

You're sitting sideways in the stroller. This is fine. Please turn to face forward*! Please turn to face straight ahead! These are fine. However, "turn to" is somewhat redundant. There's ...

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What does "pimpier" mean?
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2 votes

We can tell "pimpier" is a form of pimp (pimpier → pimpy → pimp). I would say this usage is uncommon and/or unusual, and so it is difficult to give a precise definition. In this case, I ...

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What does “something in white canvas, has long sleeves and ties in the back“ mean?
1 votes

It looks like a joke. It sounds like Matt is describing a straitjacket, and therefore, suggesting that CJ is “crazy”. A “crazy” person would believe in aliens and elves.

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