Em.
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possessive pronoun "its" with noun
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No, I do not believe that the word it can be plural. In the two examples you provide, its is the possessive form of it. There is another word, it's. "It's" is a contraction of "it" and "is". So in ...

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"Is that ok?" formal letter
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"Is that ok"? Probably not. You might want to ask May I submit a partial academic record?

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What would be the most idiomatic way of telling $10 discount when spending $98?Thanks
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There are lots of ways to say this: Take $10 off your purchase over $98 $10 off your next purchase over $98 Get $10 off your purchase over $98 Save $10 on your purchase over $98 Save $10 on purchases ...

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"He must have probably been an excellent student" -- what does it mean?
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First of all, it sounds strange. I don't think that the word probably fits in the sentence since must have implies that it was the case that he was an excellent student. Probably implies that it was ...

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Should I use 'neither one', 'none of them' or 'neither one of them' in this question?
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It seems like you are trying trying to convey the message in the simplest way possible, regardless of grammaticality. So, my response relies on what I think sounds natural. Also, I assume that you ...

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What is the rule determining use of the definite article in the expressions like "with (the?) speed equal to"?
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Here are two rules I found: The word "the" is one of the most common words in English. It is our only definite article. Nouns in English are preceded by the definite article when the speaker ...

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"Full-fledged" and "not full-fledged" adjectives: What are they?
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full-fledged completely developed, trained, or established So he is referring to words that are completely established as adjectives, from his perspective. He begins with: There are not only ...

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Is there a natural way to say "the purpose is that I want to work with you"?
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the purpose is that I want to work with you This seems fine, though more context would be helpful. Some suggestions are The reason is that I want to work with you. (I applied to this position) ...

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meaning of "love of something"
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I admit, I am not sure. But I think it means "human love for God". The main reason I prefer this over "God's love for humans" is because, if the author meant "God's love for human, than I think he/she ...

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What steps can you take ~ vs What steps you can take?
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1 votes

You have written every word correctly, good job! But the way you wrote it does sound strange. I listened to video clip and I would transcribe it like this: You then wanna formulate an action plan: ...

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what's the meaning of 'quite some' in this sentence?
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quite some A considerable amount of So there is a considerable amount of research interest that they share.

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Does "Our goal in creating this series was twofold" mean "Our goal when creating this series was twofold"?
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Small correction: Does not dose. I think Our goal when creating this series was twofold. is a very good interpretation. It really depends on the overall context, but this one seems pretty good to ...

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"Did the cleaning of the car" vs. "Did clean the car."
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The two examples you gave seem grammatically correct, and they are understandable. But they also sound strange. I would simply I cleaned the car yesterday. Suppose that I am your mother. Notice ...

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What's so interesting behind the "delete your account" meme?
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1 votes

I think the article you referenced provides a great explanation It can be seen as the online equivalent of other colloquial expressions like "kill yourself" and "go home." You could imagine that ...

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What is the meaning of this sentence?
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The double hyphen -- represents a dash [1.][2.]. Words between dashes give information about the sentence in which it is embedded. For the moment, let us ignore that information and focus on the rest: ...

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What are the differences between "ignore" and "neglect"?
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ignore to refrain from noticing or recognizing neglect to pay no attention or too little attention to; disregard or slight However, neglect also has a meaning that implies a sense of ...

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"Inspiration" meaning in context
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In this instance, inspiration means something like thing or idea that was the source of influence [1.] So it could be Taylor Swift's idea that was the source of influence for (song name)... ...

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Do the British use words like "batso" or "nutso"?
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The (generally, diminutive) -o suffix occurs in terms like Hey there, kiddo! and He's completely wacko! And it's still slightly "productive" (e.g. - Paxo for broadcaster Jeremy Paxman). But ...

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What does "turning his flirt" mean here?
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I also thought this usage of (his) flirt was strange. As you noted, a flirt is typically the person who flirts. After a moment, I thought there were a few interpretations. The first one was that flirt ...

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What does "Back up" mean in this context?
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You say back up when you want to pause a conversation and return to something that was just said. back up 4. verb To return to an item previously mentioned. Whoa, back up—Janet and Jim are getting ...

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What's the meaning of independent "as if"?
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as if —used to say that something is not true, not possible, will not happen, etc. // "I am sure I am very affectionate," said Dora; "you oughtn't to be cruel to me, Doady!" "...

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What does "facilitated a crescendo" mean?
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crescendo noun 1 b : the peak of a gradual increase : climax // ... complaints about stifling smog conditions reach a crescendo ... — Down Beat (M-W) An orgasm is referred to as a sexual ...

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What is the meaning of "at the right angles to each other" in this context?
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Yes, you have the right idea. I interpret it to imply disagreement, incompatibility, incongruity, etc. I really can't say that this is common expression, at least in everyday language. But it's ...

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Over think or overthink?
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My first instinct was that over- is a prefix and would not normally be spelled separately. Here's what Dictionary.com has to say on the matter: a prefixal use of over, preposition, adverb, or ...

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What does "jumped at small noises" mean in this context?
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I take it to mean that he jumped whenever he heard small noises. In other words, he was startled by small noises. The way I see it, at roughly tells us the cause of his jumping in this case. It does ...

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What's the meaning of "ding on the head"?
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The way I see it, ding is synonymous with injury, possibly bruise, in this case. It's just an extension of the following: ding noun [ C ] (DAMAGE) ​US a small damaged area on a surface where ...

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What is the proper way of saying "internship period"?
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Those might work. I imagine the usage can vary by company. But the common one I know is "probation", or "probationary period" (my emphasis): In a workplace setting, probation (or probationary ...

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What does 'For' mean in "For he's a jolly good fellow"?
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"For" means "because" in this case. "For He's Jolly Good Fellow" is sung to congratulate someone for something. So it doesn't make sense to say that "he has a jolly good fellow." Saying that he "is" a ...

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meaning of a question with the word "how" in context
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How is used in the usual sense to form a question. The answer is word play. The enzymes figuratively "unzip" genes. He says it unwinds the double helix at breakneck speed. Teenage boys are sexually ...

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difference between "hold something" and "hold with someting" in context
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I assume the speaker has a weight, like a dumbbell. In the original, hold roughly means maintain. With this weight roughly means while holding this weight. This hold is the one that roughly means ...

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