Apollyon
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Why does it use "if will"?
Accepted answer
2 votes

"Will" does not always function as a future marker; it can be used to mean "be willing to." So your sentence amounts to "I'm going to the prom with Brandon, if his dad is willing to lend him the car."

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Does "leaving many unemployed, furloughed or working reduced hours" modify "the global jobs market"?
1 votes

Functionally, it's an adverbial phrase modfiying the main-clause predicate "wreaked havoc on the global jobs market" and introduces the consequence of the action.

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"You and I" or "you and me"
1 votes

The kind of noun phrase following copular verbs like "be" and "become" is NOT the verb's object. It is called the subject complement. In natural English, "you and me" rather than "you and I" is used ...

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"demands that he abandon" vs. "demands that he abandons"
1 votes

In Standard American English, a bare infinitive, i.e., one without the infinitive marker "to," is used in the objective clause after verbs such as "demand, "require," etc. So "abandon" is correct. In ...

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Is there a word that refers to the phrase that follows a dialog?
1 votes

What you are looking for may be "speech tag."

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I don't understand the meaning of a phrase: "elections are all there is to democracy"
1 votes

all there is to democracy= everything that there is to democracy Consider the following sentence and how we form a relative clause out of it: John bought the book. The book (that) John bought... ...

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"Assuming we are to..." vs "Assuming we were to"
0 votes

The key to cracking the problem is to treat "I'd be happy/glad/pleased to V" not as any kind of conditional or counterfactual sentence, but simply as a present simple sentence. Then it makes ...

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Attitudes and concerns over Indian-English accent
0 votes

No, Indian accents of English are stigmatized in the Chinese-speaking world. People there have trouble distinguishing between the syllable-initial unaspirated /t/ and /d/, phonetic sounds which are ...

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Chinese names in English
0 votes

The most plausible explanation has to do with maintaining cultural pride and authenticity. Presidents represent a country, so they have their names arranged in the Chinese order as a symbol of ...

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verb after "I thought"
-1 votes

No matter how you tinker with the tenses, "raise" is wrong because it is a transitive verb, i.e., one requiring an object. The intransitive "arise" might work, modulo the tense. That said, supposing ...

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