Steve Jessop
  • Member for 7 years, 11 months
  • Last seen more than a month ago
  • Oxford, United Kingdom
What do the British call the dish which is called 'pudding' in the US
Accepted answer
19 votes

Speaking for the UK, if we served a dessert looking like that, it would probably be a chocolate mousse (although this seems to have been piped into the dish, which isn't what you'd normally do with ...

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Is it OK to mix American and British English?
19 votes

It looks weird to someone who is used to checking spelling, for example anyone who produces or checks professional copy. They're used to noticing single errors like typos, and common mis-uses like "...

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Can I use "Dress" for men's wear?
11 votes

"Dress" can mean "clothing" or "attire", but it's usually used that way in the abstract, referring to clothes in general. It's not generally used to mean the specific outfit that a person is wearing. ...

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How to answer "Do you need a 5p bag"
10 votes

The mistake you've made (and even if you were a native speaker this is still a minor mistake), is to answer a yes/no question with a sentence that the cashier needs to fully understand in order to ...

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What does "if not" mean in the given sentence
10 votes

Unfortunately the phrase is used in two ways, and especially when written it can be difficult to distinguish them. The hypothetical "if" might mean that "bitter" is acknowledged not to be true, or it ...

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Did you get married before
8 votes

Your first sentence isn't a common construction. The only way I'd say "Did you X before?" is when the order of events is part of the question: "I went for a run" "Did you stretch before [that]?" (or ...

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Should I say soccer game or soccer match?
8 votes

Something of a generalization, but if you're calling it soccer then you're most likely in the USA, or a place whose English is influenced by American English (since the USA is by far the most populous ...

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English equivalent for French "manquer de réussite" in a soccer game
8 votes

Sports commentary has a lot of clichés with specific meanings, and I don't know the specific usage of the French phrase, so I'm guessing here. But: "Didn't take their chances" -- their play on the ...

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Is "Tweety" suitable as a person's name?
7 votes

Here in the UK, we don't expect Chinese-speakers should have an English name (although of course we know that many do). Therefore, if you said "my name is Tweety" but we knew you had a Chinese name, ...

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Is "Hello." a sentence?
6 votes

according to the definition of a sentence? For the sake of a peaceful life you should accept the definition of "sentence" offered by your teacher, that will allow you to pass any exams you might be ...

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Why is "would" used in this passage?
5 votes

In this context, saying "will become" means that the event still lies in the future at time of writing. That's not what the author wanted to say. The event is in the past at the time of writing, and ...

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Do the brave deserve the fair?
5 votes

The verb doesn't need to agree with the noun "the brave", it needs to agree with the noun phrase "none but the brave". Consider: None including the brave ____ the fair The construction is the same ...

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"We missed the bus, which made us late for school" - erroneous use of "which"?
4 votes

The sentence is merely ambiguous. This is quite common with relative clauses. Since one possible interpretation is presumed untrue by the reader (that the bus itself somehow made you late), the ...

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What's 'ironic' about dismissing charges of a samaritan that was wrongly injured by a police officer?
4 votes

It's possible the author means it's "ironic" (actually more like "disappointing") that the judge said this while dismissing charges against Ms. Farrell, when such comments "should" normally be made ...

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What does "weighted pass" mean in soccer sense?
4 votes

The "weight" of a pass is how hard you hit the ball. As far as English language is concerned, the meaning is because of the association between weight and force. Weight of pass is key: The speed ...

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quality product or product quality
4 votes

First, I think I could get that test question wrong despite the fact that I'm pretty sure I have the grammar of it. It's not wholly obvious to me what is expected by the person who set it. "ABC is ...

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Is there any expressions related to eyes which means extremely tired in English?
3 votes

To answer the edited question: Can I say "I've got two glazed eyes" Yes, it's comprehensible. Saying eyes are "glazed" or "glazed over" means that they're not focussing as expected. This is ...

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Is this correct to say : "This country's economy is at stake with its oil revenues"
3 votes

It's not the only interpretation, but I read "This country's economy is at stake with its oil revenues" to mean, "This country's oil revenues are at stake, and the economy is at stake along with them"....

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How to say that you are a teacher because of your education?
2 votes

To address the phrases you asked about, any of the following is grammatically correct: "I am a teacher by education" "I am a teacher by my education" "I am a teacher according to my education" "...

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Can 'OK' be replied as a response to some bad news/things?
2 votes

"OK" can just indicate acknowledgement of what's been said, it doesn't always mean anything more. If "OK" is all you say in response to "my wife is dead" then yes, that's rude in pretty much any ...

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IS or ARE? "The only thing that I want you to hit right now IS/ARE the books"
2 votes

Most English speakers accept the use of "to be" to equate a singular with a plural. So, if you're sure that you want to equate "the books" (plural) with "the only thing" (singular), then you'd say "...

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How to understand the preposition “for” in “She is Miss Asia for 2006”
2 votes

This sentence "she is/was Miss Asia for 2006" is actually slightly ambiguous, although not in a way that makes a difference in this example. First meaning: I don't know the name of the grammar rule, ...

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Is it fine to say "completely" to lay stress on relativity of something
2 votes

In your first sentence: It seems completely relatively great but actually its final impact is not that great. I cannot clearly see which word "completely" is intended to modify. I doesn't seem ...

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Why shall passive voice be rephrased?
1 votes

Reasons vary, but I think the two main ones are: circumlocution. Your example doesn't fall into this, but sometimes the active equivalent is shorter and clearer. "A good time was had by all" is an ...

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Can advise be used as a noun?
0 votes

Regardless of whether it's in the dictionary with that meaning, some people will use a verb as a noun meaning, "an act of doing that thing", if they judge it convenient. If by "everyday speech" you ...

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