farnsy
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A word for "all the great attributes or achievements of you and/or your family"
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21 votes

The best approximation I can think of is You and your family's legacy. It's often only used at the end of someone's life, when considering a future after they are deceased, though. Another idea ...

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Difference between "contrived" and "stilted"
9 votes

When talking about a movie, I think you would be more likely to say it is stilted if you are specifically referring to the writing or acting being poorly executed. I had a hard time enjoying that ...

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Is there an antonym for the adjective "edifying"?
7 votes

If we are primarily discussing the moral effect, debasing is the first thing that comes to mind. It could apply to intellectual effects, but the primary sense is moral. Of course, "edify" is ...

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meaning of the sentence 'It's a wonder Trudeau would allow the impression it's tolerated.'
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6 votes

Here, "it's" refers to Hehr's collection of actions and "off-script remarks" or perhaps the situation created by Hehr's actions and remarks. In the third sentence, the writer says that these ...

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Does brief really mean short?
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5 votes

"Brief" is a relative term. These books consider themselves to be short when compared with their alternatives. "A Guide to Business Classics" could be a very long book. Adding "Brief" to the title ...

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efficacy or effect
4 votes

The word "efficacy" describes how well something something performs a particular task. You would not use it in place of "effect" here. An example use of efficacy would be The efficacy of standard ...

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Is there an adverb that means at an irregular interval of time?
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4 votes

"Intermittently" is what you are describing, though some may consider it a bit of a technical word. I might also say "sporadically" or "occasionally." If we look at phrases as well, we have "every so ...

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to storm at somebody vs. to rage at somebody
4 votes

Neither word is particularly common in spoken speech when used this way, so it's tough to be very definitive. Rage is most often used as a noun and storm is usually used in a more literal context. ...

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the same...as / that- What's the difference?
4 votes

First of all, the natural way of expressing this does not use "it." You are talking about a specific radio, so you would say "that," or if you are holding it in your hands, you would say "this." ...

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Is it wrong to say "owinings" as a synonym of "possessions"? If no, what is the difference?
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4 votes

Ownings is not a standard English word. If you want a synonym for possessions that is along the lines you are thinking, then you could use belongings. In my mind, "possessions" has a slight ...

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"All in all" VS "Altogether" VS "By and large"
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3 votes

By and large is not really a synonym for the other two. It means "generally speaking" or "for the most part." It implies that whatever is about to be said is mostly true over a large number of cases,...

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Why can't I use "to the point that" here?
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3 votes

This is a very subtle point. Most native speakers, including myself, would use "that" in this context. If I try and defend your lecturer's opinion, you could think of "the point" as a place. In that ...

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"Call on somebody" vs "call out on somebody"
3 votes

First note that your first example is incorrect. You should write Mary cheated on her exam. If her teachers called her out on it, she'd just deny everything. Note that the phrase "called on her" ...

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"People over age 35" or "people over the age 35" or "people over the age of 35"
3 votes

As you say, the first two versions are preferred. You can also say The greatest beneficiaries have been rich people and people over age 35. with no problems. However, I would avoid your fourth ...

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Why do people sometimes use BE instead of Am/Is/Are?
3 votes

"He be coming home late" is an example of AAVE, not standard English. It means "he is coming home late" or more recently "he comes home late (regularly)." Though the musicians in question all appear ...

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"you"+negative for general statements
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3 votes

Your examples all seem right. The word "you" can refer to the person being spoken to, or it can refer to a person in general. This is true for both negative and positive statements. She learned ...

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These are my kind of people meaning?
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3 votes

This is a common expression indicating that the speaker feels comfortable around the referenced type of person because he or she identifies with their behavior. While many people would feel ...

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Humping pumping
3 votes

Humping is slang for sex (or similar activities). The phrase "humping and pumping" probably refers to an Arnold Swhwarzenegger quote: The best activities for your health are pumping and humping ...

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What is the common word for the cover of the pot-cooking?
3 votes

Lid. The other two are easily understood but not used for pots and pans. "Cover" might be something soft or not fitted to the pot. "Top" would potentially be used to refer to a piece of a cooking ...

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The known unknowns
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2 votes

Yes, "known" is an adjective here and "unknown" is a noun. Known and unknown unknowns have been popularly discussed in this way since Donald Rumsfeld famously used the terms in ...

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Why is the definite article “the” not used in this Cambridge Dictionary example?
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2 votes

"Taking delivery of" is an idiomatic compound verb meaning to receive something being delivered. Placing "the" in front of "delivery" treats it as a noun. Delivery can be ...

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Is fair-to-middling better than middling?
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2 votes

I'm going to have to disagree with your source about the definition of fair-to-middling. I can't imagine anyone thinking it means "above average." Webster definitions: of middle, medium, or moderate ...

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"in tandem": at the same time, or one after another
2 votes

It actually sounds like you understand this pretty well. "Tandem" means two things together, either in space (as in the bicycle case) or in time (when describing events). It doesn't particularly ...

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Meaning of noun and verb with and without 'that' in between
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2 votes

The key thing to keep in mind is that lips touch makes "lips" the subject and "touch" the verb. On the other hand, lips that touch is a noun phrase. that touch acts as an adjective in this case. ...

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Are these two "Code Snippets"?
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2 votes

Yes, "code snippet" is a countable noun, so it is perfectly correct to use it as you have. For example: The following two code snippets illustrate the limitations of the direct approach. I don't ...

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"Worked the bars and sideshows along the twilight zone"... What does this mean?
2 votes

When you "work in a bar," you are typically employed by the bar or have permission to be there working an organized activity, like playing in a band. "Working" a location or group of people treats ...

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Out of eye or with eye
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2 votes

These are both 100% valid, equally common, and mean the same thing. The use of "out of" with an eye is a little bit more colloquial, while "with" would be something a more educated person (or a ...

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"Naive" Vs "Simple"
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2 votes

"Simple" is used in a number of different contexts. When applied to a person, it is a more polite way of saying "stupid." It means a person's brain doesn't work that well, irrespective of that person'...

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Correct tense with ever
2 votes

The following are the normal expressions: William Shakespeare is the best playwright who ever lived. William Shakespeare was the best playwright who ever lived. William Shakespeare is one of ...

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'underlying' --> 'underlyingly present'?
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2 votes

The solution to your immediate question is to put "underlying" before "crawling." The underlying crawling is still present in the denser regions, where the wringing and kneading occur. This ...

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