KarlG
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Mam or mum in English crime series
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6 votes

What you are hearing is not mum as in mother, but ma’am, contraction of madam, with a strongly reduced vowel. In British English, it is mostly used as a sign of repect for a woman of superior rank, ...

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What is the suffix of "feature"?
4 votes

English words ending with an apparent suffix -ure, from Latin -ura, fall into two great classes: 1) those taken from Latin, directly or through French, where the suffix was present in one or both ...

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Short on/of - really interchangeable?
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4 votes

Short of means ‘a lack of/lacking something’ or ‘not enough of something’, while short on means ‘significantly less/fewer than desired or expected’. The latter, then, always implies a comparison while ...

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Questions with "What" followed by "a/an"
4 votes

The interrogative (question word) what functions as a determiner in such questions, which means that an indefinite article, also a determiner, cannot be used. This might seem clearer in a sentence ...

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difference between “pain” and “ache”
2 votes

Neither ache nor sore can be used as you or your teacher suggest. Ache, denoting a dull, continuous pain, is intransitive, so while you can say My arm aches. You cannot say *My arm aches me. ...

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Is the doctor in or on?
2 votes

Native English speakers usually sit on benches, stools, counters, or the ground, but in any kind of chair. This is not, however, how you indicate that a professional person is available, especially if ...

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How has becoming (grammatical structure)
1 votes

Becoming a pilot is a gerund, also called gerund participle, and is the subject of your example sentence, just like exercise here: How has daily exercise enriched your life as a wife and mother? ...

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Confused of "the conference isn't until later today"
1 votes

The present tense simple is often used for a future event when there is a time expression indicating when the event is expected to take place. The new, stricter regulations don't come into effect ...

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What do the word these refer to?
1 votes

This sentence is so horribly written it's difficult to know where to begin. Few sentence elements appear as single nouns, adjectives, or even participles. The overall effect is bloat and confusion. ...

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kind of past tense
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0 votes

You are looking for a tense to describe repeated actions/states in the past. This is called the past with habitual aspect or habitual past, which can be expressed in several ways: Simple Past [with ...

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How should I pronounce "th" well?
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I find that many non-native speakers manage to set up properly for the th-sounds, but don't maintain enough tension or aren't able to move to the next sound quickly enough for fluent speech. The only ...

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I have a problem with the past tense narrative
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Participles only express time, i.e., can be said to have tense, relative to the finite verb in the main clause; they have no effect on narrative time. A present participle indicates a concurrent ...

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"Electronics consultant" or "Electronic consultant"?
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0 votes

You sense correctly that the first noun in a compound word, i.e., used attributively, is rarely used in the plural. A toothbrush is not for a single tooth, but *teethbrush does not exist. A peach tree ...

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Is it "How does my soul taste?" or "How does my soul tastes"?
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In English, there can be only one conjugated verb that agrees with the subject. Did he really eat a dozen chocolate bars at one sitting? She has already done her homework. We were not consulted on ...

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Can we say "The many books have included this topic."?
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0 votes

The pattern is: the + noun + restrictive clause The many items sold on eBay... The few birds we saw today... The thousands of students pouring into Ft. Lauderdale... This pattern can ...

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Is it possible to use past perfect tense without using a certain time of past?
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The past perfect is strictly a referential tense that places something further in the past than some subsequent event. Without reference to that event, there is no reason to use the past perfect. ...

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How to speak faster?
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0 votes

First, isolate the problem: in this sentence you must pronounce the after is and of. Despite the spelling, both words end in voiced consonants. If speakers of your native language generally devoice ...

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How to use "as if" correctly?
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An "as if" clause is a perfect example of a contrary-to-fact statement that should be in the subjunctive. Since the imaginary event would have happened in the past, the tense looks like the past ...

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'X makes the device operate' or 'X makes the device operates'
-1 votes

Some verbs, such as make, let, see and hear, may be followed by an infinitive without the infinitive marker to. Others, such as help, dare, and need may include the to in some contexts but are often ...

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