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Oct
8
comment Meaning of 'pound' in “felt a fury that was not his own pound through his body”
Thank-you @Chronocidal. Great explanation. Yes, I would actually not put a comma in. That’s why I said ‘it could do with a comma there - almost!)
Oct
8
answered Ending a conversation with someone you don't want to talk to
Oct
8
comment Meaning of 'pound' in “felt a fury that was not his own pound through his body”
Why is that, @tkk? It sounds a bit unnatural to me.
Oct
6
comment I have some reservations about reservations
So, what are you asking, exactly?
Oct
6
comment I have some reservations about reservations
Oh, I thought you had asked about using the word 'with an English scholar'. And you went on to say 'I would like to know whether the usage in the above sentence is right or wrong. If it is wrong, what is the proper word here?'. So I think you'd better define where you mean by 'here'. Because if the answer to 'here' is 'India' then the answer to that appears to be 'reservations'. So then I am wondering, what are you asking, exactly?
Oct
6
answered I have some reservations about reservations
Oct
6
comment “articulated in limb”
If it was 'articulate in limb' it would be a more, er, articulate, witty phrase. I'm wondering if someone 'corrected' the original copy. 'articulate in limb, articulate in speech' means 'can move in a wiity, clever way - and talk that way too!' Which... would have been a nice turn of phrase. Wood have... Big difference one 'd' made.
Oct
6
comment “Shake your head all you like” meaning
Yes, it sounds like a 'no' to me as well.
Oct
6
comment “Shake your head all you like” meaning
'however much you shake your head in disbelief, or denial, Elphias, the facts are, as they actually happened, at the funeral' is a paraphrase.
Oct
6
comment Meaning of 'pound' in “felt a fury that was not his own pound through his body”
Yes there is a tiny pause after 'not his own', without which, the sentence is hard to understand. It could do with a comma there (almost!). 'He felt a fury, that was not his own, pound through his body'. 😊
Oct
6
answered Is there a word that means that a computer is sending data to multiple computers?
Oct
6
comment “A tin of biscuits” vs “A biscuit tin”
Oh yes! We had one just like this! From a jumble sale! I also saw a mustard coloured china woven basketry effect one, once. Similar barrel shape, china lid, no handle. Fairly horrid.
Sep
18
comment Usage of words… run behind the windows
You’re welcome! If you say ‘machinery’ it sounds more likely to be stationary and not moving. If you say ‘agricultural vehicles; or ‘farm vehicles’, or ‘tractors’, or ‘farm trucks’ or a combo of those, then it sounds more likely that they are moving.
Sep
17
comment Usage of words… run behind the windows
@AIQ yes, it is actually ambiguous as to what is still or moving, which is what I think the writer needs to sort out.
Sep
17
comment Usage of words… run behind the windows
Yes exactly, @J.R. - that's exactly what I meant when I said 'vehicles, and especially agricultural vehicles, can stand still when they are running'.
Sep
17
comment Usage of words… run behind the windows
I am merely giving an example of how additional words could be used, to make the phrase clearer. I chose fairly outre words to make that clear. The writer will need to choose their own words according to exactly what their goal is. @AIQ
Sep
17
comment “No matter how large the finite set” OR “No matter how large the finite set **is**”
...He do often, give excellent and clear answers like this in a comment. Which is a pity as they would be more useful as an answer and would result in more answered questions! Come on @FumbleFingers! Please post!
Sep
17
answered Usage of words… run behind the windows
Sep
16
comment Passive sentence
I agree with Weather Vane 😊
Sep
11
answered “no A and B” or “no A and no B” or “no A or B” or “no A or no B”?