2018
Jul
10
awarded  Yearling
2017
Jul
10
awarded  Yearling
2016
Aug
24
comment What's an adjective for excessively hand gesturing while talking?
@Chowzen I prefer "gesticular" :)
Aug
24
comment What's an adjective for excessively hand gesturing while talking?
It should be noted that you can be an "animated" talker/speaker without any hand gestures, e.g. if your face is highly expressive or your whole body moves energetically. If you're trying to convey the specific idea of hand movements, use of this word requires additional clarification.
Jul
10
awarded  Yearling
May
31
comment Can we call a divorced woman single?
@KRyan True, I do make a broad generalization, and you may very well be an exception that breaks it. Though I've been in a similarly long-lived relationship and had the exact opposite experience at nearly as many weddings (everyone rooted for my girlfriend to catch it every time). Actually, it would have been considered rude by all if she'd been excluded, at least in the culture of our friends and their families.
May
31
comment Can we call a divorced woman single?
@GManNickG I'll point to the use of the term "generally" in this answer, which leaves a fair margin for edge cases like the one you're pointing out. So yes, I'll concede that being divorced does not absolutely imply being single, but this answer is still correct, even if it doesn't explicitly address that point. Perhaps you could edit it to be more precise.
May
31
comment Can we call a divorced woman single?
@GManNickG Consider the wedding tradition of the bouquet toss. The organizer typically (in my experience, at least) calls for "all single ladies" to participate. This is meant only to exclude married ladies from participating, as the "point" of the game is to divine who will be the next to marry. In fact, all women who have a date with them, however romantically involved they may be, are particularly encouraged to participate. So, "single" does not necessarily mean "not in a relationship of any kind".
May
31
comment Can we call a divorced woman single?
Agreed with gnasher, "divorced" and "widowed" absolutely apply to the current relationship status - they describe how a person became single. A remarried widow is her former husband's widow, yes, but she's no longer widowed. Also, I've never heard the term "single parent" used to describe a married parent. Even if a child is exclusively cared for by one of their two married parents, the one caring for the child is not a single parent. The implication of "single parent" is that such a parent has the tough job of caring for their child without support of a spouse (even if only financial).
Feb
24
comment What is the difference between 'go camping' and 'go to camp'?
I'd say no, it can be fully understood when taken literally. It may require context to be meaningful, but that doesn't make it idiomatic because that requirement is the same for both native and non-native speakers.
Feb
24
comment What is the difference between 'go camping' and 'go to camp'?
"to camp" can be used as an infinitive, i.e. to refer to the activity of camping, even if a compound called a camp doesn't exist.
Feb
24
comment What is the difference between 'go camping' and 'go to camp'?
"I go to camp" is also a response to a question like "What do you do when it gets dark out?"
Feb
24
answered Better way to say “No bulls--t”
2015
Dec
15
comment Say “Her face is triangle” is wrong or right?
I would sooner say "triangle-shaped" than "triangularly-shaped". Adding -ly to "[shape]ular" to form an adverb would likely be understood, but in my experience is only found in practice when someone speaking is fumbling with their words.
Dec
14
comment Singular or plural when indicating something unique owned by many
Just to add to the confusion, there's also an idiomatic form for expressing preference: "Tom likes a dog with a long tail." Taken literally, it refers to a specific dog. It can be used, however, to describe Tom's taste in dog tails in general.
Dec
1
answered Am I overusing “the” in this sentence?
Dec
1
comment Differences between “during travelling through bus” and “while travelling on bus”
Or While travelling on a bus...
Nov
24
comment Food is cold, put it on fire or put it on flame?
@AndyT If I'm sitting by a fire, saying "Put it on the fire" means I want you to warm the thing up in the fire, while saying "Put it on fire" means I want you to ignite the thing. Even if a literal fire isn't immediately available, the article is generally necessary to make this distinction.
Nov
19
answered Use of grateful
Nov
18
comment is “them” only used for people?
As a singular pronoun, them can only refer to a person, e.g. "If someone asks you for help, give them a hand." versus "If you drop a ball, pick them up." Your answer explains the asker's example, but not the source of their confusion: that them can be singular or plural.