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Should we use 'the' every time when writing about a specific thing?
4 votes

Yes you should always add "the", if you want to specifically say somebody. If you say: And then snowman ... Would sound strange, you need to say: And then the snowman ... Without the &...

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The stakeholders - Authors, peer reviewers and editors
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3 votes

As mentioned in the Oxford Dictionary, The definition is: a person with an interest or concern in something, especially a business. It says "especially", doesn't mean it has to be in ...

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Can we use past tense of verb for present tense?
3 votes

Finished is incorrect, you can't use past tense for present tense, but if you really meant to use past tense: If you finished this burger in 5 minutes I would have given you one more. So currently:...

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What does ' you have heart' mean or imply in this sentence?
3 votes

This could be easily a synonym of: You have courage. It simply could mean (one of the meanings from Cambridge Dictionary): courage, determination, or hope

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Should "above" and "below" be put before or after the noun?
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3 votes

They all are okay, but I think: Please see the picture above. Please see the picture below. are better, but all sentences you listed are valid English sentences.

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"Supported by" or "Sponsored by"?
2 votes

In this context, you have support/sponsorship on one YouTube video. Differences: "Sponsored by" would be more like a bigger company paying you for the video, and they're usually responsible ...

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In a comparison sentence, can “than” be omitted?
2 votes

"1000 times" doesn't need an extra than. than is use for comparison on what's on the left and what's on the right. "1000 times" already mentions the difference. "times" ...

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such an expensive car
2 votes

I say both of them are a bit not grammatical. Since such an is virtually meaning (in this case): to so high a degree; so great (often used to emphasize a quality). Whereas you're saying: I'd never ...

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Can we say "It's sunny outside" when it doesn't have much sunlight?
2 votes

It's sunny just means... Simply there is sun outside... It doesn't declare that it's super hot, or super sunny. As mentioned in the Cambridge Dictionary: bright because of light from the sun It ...

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How do I pronounce 'toml'
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2 votes

It's prounounced: tom-el So "tom" (like the name) pronounced as usual, and then a letter "l", pronounced like "el" (as in "elephant"). So "tomel" it ...

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On a phrase that combines "can be" and "no longer"
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2 votes

They're both proper grammar, but personally I see people use: The cars can no longer be used as public vehicles. More of the time.

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What does ‘towards the end of the week’ exactly mean?
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2 votes

I would say the third option: call her anytime but preferably at the end of the week As we see, towards means: in the direction of. So the meaning should be: call her anytime in the ...

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"If + would" conditional in present perfect tense
2 votes

First example: ✔ Correct Second example: ✖ Incorrect Either having had without would, or having have with would are both correct, Can't mix those to up!

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What does "do shit" mean?
1 votes

"do shit" is just a more rude and abusive way of saying "do anything". Like "you cannot do shit" would be "you cannot do anything". In this sentence it would ...

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Any word for beautiful but unknown places?
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1 votes

I would say somethings like: off the beaten track off the beaten track (US also off the beaten path) in a place where few people go, far from any main roads and towns: The farmhouse we stayed in ...

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'Let not + noun/pronoun' vs 'Let + noun/pronoun + not'
1 votes

The first two sentences: Let not him go. & Let not the boy go. Wouldn't work, it is a verb + adverb, which isn't proper English grammar in this case. Only verb + pronoun would work in this case, ...

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You did not have to be a clairvoyant to see ... / Not have to be a clairvoyant to see
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1 votes

The first two are grammatically correct, but the meanings are different for them. Sentence 1: You did not have to be a clairvoyant to see that the war would go on. The first sentence is in past ...

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Walk in the trees, or walk around the trees?
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1 votes

I say the second sentence is correct. The first sentence is with "in", therefore "in" would possibly be misinterpreted to be walking "inside" a tree. But if I where you. ...

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"I kept sleeping" or "I kept asleep"
1 votes

kept sleeping is the proper way here. Saying asleep is mentioning that you are currently sleeping. Doesn't match with proper english grammar.

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That was about as good as it got for the visitors
1 votes

It means: Somebody telling the other that what they did was virtually the best thing possibly they could do to the visitors. They couldn't do any better.

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We loved the idea of
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1 votes

Loved refers to that past, since it's in past tense. Or often it refers to an idea that we all loved, but didn't happen/work. Actually, usually that's what it means. This case it's a bit of a broad ...

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How to use the "who ...." modifier in a 's sentence?
1 votes

Here the second example of: I am very jealous of a friend who I've known for 10 years' success. Would sound better. If you say: I am very jealous of a friend's success, who I've known for over 10 ...

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What's the verb form when use "I am" with "Who" restrictive clause?
Accepted answer
1 votes

You have to say "takes", you can't say "take". The sentence has to be: I'm a person who takes notes. If you are the one who is meant to take notes, you should say: I'm the ...

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Department of education vs department for education
1 votes

Both should be proper grammar, but we usually say "The Department of Education" as in the second sentence. Actually there is both: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Department_for_Education The ...

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Does the usage of 'the' change the meaning of these sentences?
1 votes

"the" usually is used for a specific thing. Whereas without using the "the" means that the man talks to angels generally. I will change the "angel" to just regular "...

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Is it correct to say "are you getting used to your new friends now?" or "do you know them better now"?
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1 votes

Your two examples of: are you getting used to your new friends now? And: do you know them better now? Are all proper grammar. The first sentence uses "getting used to", which means: If ...

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Use of "Much", "Many" and "More" in English
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1 votes

Here are my explanations: Our school only has Apple computers. However, some students are more familiar with PCs. The above ^ means that some of the students use PCs more often or they like to use ...

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Why is it "will be" instead of "is" here?
1 votes

"is" would be proper grammar in this case too, but "is" would have a different meaning. The meaning of "is" could be used in a sentence something like the below: In this ...

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Is "nobody could survive on its own" grammatically correct?
Accepted answer
1 votes

People aren't objects, so you shouldn't use "it's", you should use "their". If I were you, I would say: Nobody could survive on their own You should use "their" instead ...

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What should I say in response to "I hope next year is better"?
1 votes

Here are the options that I can think of: I will call the other person Bob. To reply hoping the Covid-19 pandemic will be better: Option 1: Bob: "I hope next year is better" You: "Yeah ...

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