Gamora
  • Member for 2 years, 6 months
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3 answers
38 votes
6k views
Why did my "seldom" get corrected?
Accepted answer
91 votes

Seldom is a word and you have used it correctly, however not very naturally! Seldom - not often; rarely (def. from google) I disagree with the correction. A better way to say this is: I also ...

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5 answers
19 votes
6k views
Can I say: “The train departs at 16 past every hour“?
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44 votes

I have seen this written many times on bus timetables etc. and find no reason why someone wouldn't understand it. To be extra clear, I would make one amend:: The train departs at 16 minutes past ...

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6 answers
24 votes
32k views
The correct capital G and J in cursive
24 votes

As a Brit, I agree with the previous answer, that the capital letters are the wrong way round. Here is an example picture which looks correct for all letters to me: It's worth mentioning that, ...

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2 answers
7 votes
3k views
How to understand "No she bludgering well won't!"
6 votes

Although I agree with Em as to the meaning of the phrase, I would slightly amend the reasoning. A bludger is (of course) a black iron ball used in the wizarding sport of Quidditch. I would put ...

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1 answers
2 votes
213 views
Difference between "lay" and "bury"
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6 votes

I think there is an issue with the definitions for each of the words you've provided. To bury a person, you would first have to lay them in the hole and then cover them in soil. It's worth noting ...

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1 answers
2 votes
139 views
Meaning of "productivity hacker's wet dream"
5 votes

So I'm not going to go into terrible detail with this, for reasons which will become obvious when you read the link. Essentially, a wet dream is a way to say a very very good dream. Read more on in ...

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1 answers
1 votes
172 views
do you say "to pour hard objects out of a container"?
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4 votes

Tip Out - To empty a vessel of its contents by tipping it over. A noun or pronoun is used between "tip" and "out." It's worth noting that, although less usual, you could also tip out a liquid. You ...

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2 answers
2 votes
1k views
"Off the top of one's head" or "by heart"
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4 votes

Generally, off the top of my head is usually used to refer to the first thing that pops into your head. What's the capital of Mauritania?---I don't know off the top of my head, but I could go and ...

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1 answers
1 votes
23 views
Does `then` indicate a performance order when talk about a comparison?
4 votes

Yes, then does indicate order. Then - (adverb) next or after that Cambridge Dictionary In this context, it just means that the thing before the then comes before the thing after the then. First,...

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2 answers
2 votes
97 views
Went down the garden vs went down to the garden
4 votes

I believe this is a (BrE only?) colloquialism. You'd never usually see it written but a lot of people I know (especially in the North of England) miss out "to" and "the". You may see it occasionally ...

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3 answers
2 votes
879 views
What does the phrase "head down the rat's hole" mean here?
4 votes

It's a bit of a funny one as I believe it's considered colloquial rather than "proper" English, but to head in [a direction] just means to go towards that direction. A similar question has actually ...

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1 answers
1 votes
1k views
"During years 2017-2019" vs. "During the years 2017-2019"
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4 votes

"During years 2017-2019" and "During the years 2017-2019" both sound unnatural since "years" is discrete, not continuous, and you are describing a period rather than naming the specific years. (You ...

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2 answers
0 votes
55 views
What is the meaning of "tramp asleep"?
4 votes

A Tramp is a person with no home, job, or money who travels around and asks for money from other people. Synonymous to a homeless person but tends to be a slightly more derogatory word Ref. Asleep is ...

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2 answers
0 votes
45 views
Is the following sentence ambiguous?
3 votes

This isn't ambiguous for the following reasons: Anyone - Any person or people (from your link) Now lets break that down, the main part of this definition is the word any, then it becomes quite ...

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2 answers
0 votes
63 views
What's the (still negative) opposite of "arrogant"
3 votes

Removing any words I would consider positive from this list of antonyms of arrogant I found on Merriam Webster: Near Antonyms of arrogant: cowering, cringing, mousy (or mousey), ...

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1 answers
2 votes
66 views
How would NSE interpret "eyebrows moments"?
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3 votes

I think that this is referring to "raised eyebrows", but without more context I wouldn't be certain. Its a less common way to say the phase, but that's how I would interpret it. raise an eyebrow/ ...

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1 answers
2 votes
1k views
The use of phrase "years ago" in context
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3 votes

The word years is the key here, since it's plural. Ago - You use ago when you are referring to past time. For example, if something happened one year ago, it is one year since it happened. If it ...

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2 answers
1 votes
328 views
Get up enough nerves to do something
Accepted answer
3 votes

get up (one's) nerve (to do something) - To muster or draw upon one's courage or resolve to do something. The Free Dictionary In your context, the mother doesn't have the courage to tell her children ...

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3 answers
1 votes
4k views
Are there specific names for forehead jewelry?
3 votes

I think you mean Maangtika and Jhoomar. There are a few other variations you can find here.

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4 answers
15 votes
1k views
What does the phrase "building hopping chop" mean here?
3 votes

In the context, building - refers to to increase or strengthen by adding gradually to. Given your definition of hopping chops (not, to my ear, a phrase outside of the game), I would interpret the ...

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2 answers
2 votes
32k views
Despite vs although
3 votes

‘in spite of’, ‘despite’ and ‘although’ are all used to show contrast and are used for the same meaning. The only difference is the way they are used; the structure in which they are used. ‘in spite ...

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1 answers
0 votes
78 views
Why is the repetition of "is" in these type of sentences?
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3 votes

It's the double is construction. The what is implied: {What} the thing is, is I'm in a hurry" {What} I thought was, is/was that..." NB It doesn't necessarily involve a double "is" or a "...

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2 answers
0 votes
27 views
Does inversion change the meaning of the sentence: "As she did..., she could"
3 votes

Someone may correct me, but I do not believe there is any difference between the two. The two parts of the sentence would work in either order and don't change the overall meaning.

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1 answers
3 votes
61 views
Does being ''carried away'' mean to do something unintentional?
2 votes

In short, yes. It's a turn of phrase that means you got completely wrapped up in the activity. Usually it's used as an excuse as to why you're late or didn't get something done! [Sorry I didn't ...

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1 answers
0 votes
159 views
Does the term 'molest' exclude actual penetration?
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2 votes

As is already pointed out in the comments from @Michael: The best answer you are going to get will be based on the dictionary meanings of 'molest', e.g. (Cambridge Dictionary) "to touch or attack ...

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3 answers
7 votes
1k views
What does "notoriety" mean here?
2 votes

Notoriety does not have positive or negative connotations. It's all about context... Notoriety - is the state of being notorious which is just generally known and talked of. Now, this definition ...

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1 answers
0 votes
128 views
What is a "thick nose?"
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2 votes

It's not a very common way of describing a nose, so I can see why one might find this confusing. As @Liron has mentioned, thick means "having a large distance between two sides". With a nose, you ...

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2 answers
1 votes
279 views
very impressed-->dead impressed (adjective)
2 votes

I would use with caution. Its not really proper English but is used quite commonly among the less well spoken population. It is becoming more common, but (in my opinion) should not used as an adverb ...

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1 answers
0 votes
35 views
When someone loves brands in clothing
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2 votes

All of them are perfectly acceptable. I'd lean more towards "clothing" on the first two, but there is nothing wrong (as far as I'm aware) with any of these. To my ear, "brand name/name brand" are ...

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5 answers
3 votes
315 views
A team with high solidarity
2 votes

One phrase which comes to mind very close to your description is: Camaraderie/comradery - mutual trust and friendship among people who spend a lot of time together. (Google Definitions) Both words ...

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