kaipmdh
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There isn’t Jessica here. vs Jessica isn't here
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4 votes

The first sentence implies that Jessica could be expected to be in that location. The second sentence, as written, is ungrammatical. The more correct expression would be 'There isn't a Jessica here'. ...

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What's the meaning of "Into the stone sky"?
2 votes

I am going to have to caveat this with the fact that I know nothing about the game in question, but the unit looks to be a helicopter called Perun. Perun is the name of a Slavic god of thunder and ...

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either easier or easy
2 votes

The sentence as you have written is grammatically correct. There is no issue with the tenses, etc. It's a question of nuance. As the sentence describes the process of dieting, there is implied ...

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Meaning of song's chorus "Shudder to think"
2 votes

I had to look up the lyrics to the song as I haven't heard it, but it looks like the whole song is about considering life without your love being reflected back to you. "Off on standby" in this case ...

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Can "mess around" be used in this context?
1 votes

It's natural and suitable in the colloquialism given that the preceding sentence uses a wear word. You could use something like "I wasn't kidding" but it may be tautological given the "...

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What's meant here by "solid material'?
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1 votes

This is a playful way to describe the value of this strange object. The "solid material" in this case is meant to invoke the idea of gold, silver or other precious metal. It is a sentence about the ...

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The stool is under the ladder. You want to remove the stool. Would you say "to take the stool out of/off the ladder"?
1 votes

In most common verbal usage, you'd chain some prepositions together: Spoken American English: "Take the stool out from under the ladder."

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'went with it' and 'hard five massive major ammunition sites' meaning
1 votes

He's actually saying "We hit very, very hard, five massive major ammunition sites." Now that you know that he's talking about a hit on an ammunition site, hopefully the "went with it" becomes clear - ...

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Is it idiomatic to say "I am here just to listen"?
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1 votes

Out of the three you posted, the second one is the most idiomatic. "I am here just to listen" would be understood to mean what you want - to learn about the topic from more knowledgeable friends. ...

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What "verb" to use for "stop flowing" in this context
1 votes

You could easily use gather. Accumulate is a little bit more formal, but would also get the point across. You might also want to think about using the verb to pool as in Pooled rain water will easily ...

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Words that mean ''to do or say something unexpectedly''?
1 votes

While it's not a single word, 'to blurt out' is an expression for saying something unexpectedly, without thinking.

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The use of the verb "speed" in context
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1 votes

"Speed" as a verb is chiefly used in the context of driving a vehicle above the speed limit. "I like going fast" or "I like the sense of speed" would be preferable to me over "because I like speed" ...

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How to write about this kind of situation?
1 votes

Is this statement is grammatically true? To tell the truth, My grades is kind of embarrassing, I've tried really hard but I couldn't pass the practical exam. I'm really sorry! It is not ...

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Does "with" here mean the friend and Grylls parachuted almost at the same?
1 votes

Not necessarily. He may have been at the site of the landing immediately following. The person was "with" Grylls when he was in the body brace. It is unclear from the context whether they jumped ...

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What does "you're comin' at my friends" mean?
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1 votes

"You are being aggressive at my friends". This is heightened by "like a missile" (an offensive weapon) and the line after. The singer is asking what has caused the person's aggression

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What is the difference between "Fly in a city" and "Fly to a city"?
1 votes

"The plane has just flown in New York" implies a flight within the boundaries of New York. You could say that a new, experimental plane could take off, fly in a circle, and land in the same place, as ...

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Posting memes, photos and jokes ‘is’ not or ‘are’ not?
1 votes

Number 1 is correct. I parse it in my head as "[The] posting [of] lame memes, photos and jokes is not going to make you funny." So it's a referring to a singular act.

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What does the phrase "space-warping portals" mean here?
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0 votes

This has to do with "warping of space-time". The easiest real-world corollary would be if you were to place a heavy ball on a blanket. The ball warps (changes the shape) of the blanket, bringing parts ...

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Feel the need+of? is this correct? i dont think it is, but i may be wrong
0 votes

It would not conventionally be used. The structure "feel the need to (infinitive)" is correct. "Why do you feel the need to convince him to eat ice cream?" would be the correct way to phrase your ...

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does "poise somebody" mean "invite", "ask", or some other meaning?
0 votes

It's about readiness of action rather than being asked or invited. Consider the word 'counterpoise' which indicates an opposing or balancing of, well, a poise. So you could say that certain actions by ...

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What is the opposite of "in the dark"?
-1 votes

The most common way to refer to the opposite of being in the dark is 'in the know'. But note that 'in the dark' in the form of your examples "we're in the dark just as much as you are." and "College ...

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Is "It was she did" grammatically correct?
-1 votes

"It was she did" is incorrect. "It was her" would be correct.

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