2 Added link description
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I just came across a sentence which confused me a lot.

In Cambridge Dictionary, there's a sentence:

You should have heard the audience applaud - the noise was fantastic.

I think that the action "applaud" in this context is a past action, so shouldn't it be "You should have heard the audience applauded" instead? Can anyone please explain this type of grammatical structure?

Here is the link: enter link description hereTranslation of "applaud" - English-Traditional Chinese dictionary

I just came across a sentence which confused me a lot.

In Cambridge Dictionary, there's a sentence:

You should have heard the audience applaud - the noise was fantastic.

I think that the action "applaud" in this context is a past action, so shouldn't it be "You should have heard the audience applauded" instead? Can anyone please explain this type of grammatical structure?

Here is the link: enter link description here

I just came across a sentence which confused me a lot.

In Cambridge Dictionary, there's a sentence:

You should have heard the audience applaud - the noise was fantastic.

I think that the action "applaud" in this context is a past action, so shouldn't it be "You should have heard the audience applauded" instead? Can anyone please explain this type of grammatical structure?

Here is the link: Translation of "applaud" - English-Traditional Chinese dictionary

1
source | link

should have p.p + verb

I just came across a sentence which confused me a lot.

In Cambridge Dictionary, there's a sentence:

You should have heard the audience applaud - the noise was fantastic.

I think that the action "applaud" in this context is a past action, so shouldn't it be "You should have heard the audience applauded" instead? Can anyone please explain this type of grammatical structure?

Here is the link: enter link description here