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5 added missing words, fixed spelling, (did not correct all the grammar because the question is well written)
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Both teachers are native English speakers, but I don't giveplace too much faith on that. I'm a native German speaker but I couldn't teach anyone how the grammar of German future works.

We (my wife and I but also our teachers) both agree that "will" and "going to" indicate something to happen in the future. We also agree that the difference is just a matter of probability. However, we have opposite understandingunderstandings on that probability.

When to use "will" and when to use "going to"? Is it a matter of probability? Is it a matter of stylistics (e.g. will will for the single sentence examples and be going tobe going to for the multi-sentence examples as pointed out in one of the comments)? Is it a matter of how far into the future (present prediction vs. future prediction)?

Oxford dictionaryDictionary

I looked up the definition of "will (modal verb)" in the Oxford advanced learners dictionaryAdvanced Learners Dictionary, sixth impressumimpression and it says:

Second, I looked it up in my English textbook, which is Inlingua English 2 Step 1. Unit 7 is about "Planning" and there is an exercise 7.3 about decisions. While I would consider a decision and plans as something with high probability (because I can influence it), all the sentences start with "going to", which contradicts my understanding. Unfortunately, the Inlingua book is quite crap, because it seldom gives definitions and bases everything on examples only.

is that a promise, a voluntary action or maybe both? I just don't get it.

Both teachers are native English speakers, but I don't give too much on that. I'm a native German speaker but I couldn't teach anyone how the grammar of German future works.

We (my wife and I but also our teachers) both agree that "will" and "going to" indicate something to happen in the future. We also agree that the difference is just a matter of probability. However, we have opposite understanding on that probability.

When to use "will" and when to use "going to"? Is it a matter of probability? Is it a matter of stylistics (e.g. will for the single sentence examples and be going to for the multi-sentence examples as pointed out in one of the comments)? Is it a matter of how far into the future (present prediction vs. future prediction)?

Oxford dictionary

I looked up the definition of "will (modal verb)" in the Oxford advanced learners dictionary, sixth impressum and it says:

Second, I looked it up in my English textbook, which is Inlingua English 2 Step 1. Unit 7 is about "Planning" and there is an exercise 7.3 about decisions. While I would consider a decision and plans as something with high probability (because I can influence it), all the sentences start with "going to", which contradicts my understanding. Unfortunately the Inlingua book is quite crap, because it seldom gives definitions and bases everything on examples only.

is that a promise, a voluntary action or maybe both? I just don't it.

Both teachers are native English speakers, but I don't place too much faith on that. I'm a native German speaker but I couldn't teach anyone how the grammar of German future works.

We (my wife and I but also our teachers) both agree that "will" and "going to" indicate something to happen in the future. We also agree that the difference is just a matter of probability. However, we have opposite understandings on that probability.

When to use "will" and when to use "going to"? Is it a matter of probability? Is it a matter of stylistics (e.g. will for the single sentence examples and be going to for the multi-sentence examples as pointed out in one of the comments)? Is it a matter of how far into the future (present prediction vs. future prediction)?

Oxford Dictionary

I looked up the definition of "will (modal verb)" in the Oxford Advanced Learners Dictionary, sixth impression and it says:

Second, I looked it up in my English textbook, which is Inlingua English 2 Step 1. Unit 7 is about "Planning" and there is an exercise 7.3 about decisions. While I would consider a decision and plans as something with high probability (because I can influence it), all the sentences start with "going to", which contradicts my understanding. Unfortunately, the Inlingua book is quite crap, because it seldom gives definitions and bases everything on examples only.

is that a promise, a voluntary action or maybe both? I just don't get it.

4 Formatted, especially to fix misused code formatting; removed non-descriptive fluff.
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TLDR

I'm not satisfied with the answers about will and going to on ELL. Could someone explain it in depth?

Background

We (my wife and I but also our teachers) both agree that will"will" and going to"going to" indicate something to happen in the future. We also agree that the difference is just a matter of probability. However, we have opposite understanding on that probability.

My wife / my wife`swife"s teacher says:

Probably "Probably", maybe"maybe" and perhaps"perhaps" are keywords pointing towards to use of will"will".

There are no keywords for going to"going to", but it should be used when something is very certain to happen.

Going to "Going to" is used in cases with low probability

Will "Will" is used with high probability.

The latter model fits very well to what I have learned at school. However, my wife`swife"s teacher says that one reason for Germans to have the difficulty is that we learn it wrong at school.

When to use will"will" and when to use going to"going to"? Is it a matter of probability? Is it a matter of stylistics (e.g. will for the single sentence examples and be going to for the multi-sentence examples as pointed out in one of the comments)? Is it a matter of how far into the future (present prediction vs. future prediction)?

Oxford dictionary

Oxford dictionary

I looked up the definition of "will will (modal verb)(modal verb)" in the Oxford advanced learners dictionary, sixth impressum and it says:

From these descriptions, my opinion is that will"will" is used for higher probability (a general truth is more likely than something else, habits are more likely than non-habits). I also can't find any of the keywords in the examples given in the Oxford dictionary.

I also tried looking up going to"going to", but it's neither present under going to"going to" nor could I find it under go"go".

Inlingua textbook

Inlingua textbook

Second, I looked it up in my English textbook, which is Inlingua English 2 Step 1. Unit 7 is about "Planning" and there is an exercise 7.3 about decisions. While I would consider a decision and plans as something with high probability (because I can influence it), all the sentences start with going to"going to", which contradicts my understanding. Unfortunately the Inlingua book is quite crap, because it seldom gives definitions and bases everything on examples only.

We use will"will" and going to"going to" to discuss forecasts that are quite certain.

English Page

English Page

Derived from "might", this sounds both suitable for improbable cases.

Other ELL questions

Finally, I have looked up similar questions on ELL:

TLDR

I'm not satisfied with the answers about will and going to on ELL. Could someone explain it in depth?

Background

We (my wife and I but also our teachers) both agree that will and going to indicate something to happen in the future. We also agree that the difference is just a matter of probability. However, we have opposite understanding on that probability.

My wife / my wife`s teacher says:

Probably, maybe and perhaps are keywords pointing towards to use of will.

There are no keywords for going to, but it should be used when something is very certain to happen.

Going to is used in cases with low probability

Will is used with high probability.

The latter model fits very well to what I have learned at school. However, my wife`s teacher says that one reason for Germans to have the difficulty is that we learn it wrong at school.

When to use will and when to use going to? Is it a matter of probability? Is it a matter of stylistics (e.g. will for the single sentence examples and be going to for the multi-sentence examples as pointed out in one of the comments)? Is it a matter of how far into the future (present prediction vs. future prediction)?

Oxford dictionary

I looked up the definition of will (modal verb) in the Oxford advanced learners dictionary, sixth impressum and it says:

From these descriptions, my opinion is that will is used for higher probability (a general truth is more likely than something else, habits are more likely than non-habits). I also can't find any of the keywords in the examples given in the Oxford dictionary.

I also tried looking up going to, but it's neither present under going to nor could I find it under go.

Inlingua textbook

Second, I looked it up in my English textbook, which is Inlingua English 2 Step 1. Unit 7 is about "Planning" and there is an exercise 7.3 about decisions. While I would consider a decision and plans as something with high probability (because I can influence it), all the sentences start with going to, which contradicts my understanding. Unfortunately the Inlingua book is quite crap, because it seldom gives definitions and bases everything on examples only.

We use will and going to to discuss forecasts that are quite certain.

English Page

Derived from "might", this sounds both suitable for improbable cases.

Other ELL questions

Finally, I have looked up similar questions on ELL:

Background

We (my wife and I but also our teachers) both agree that "will" and "going to" indicate something to happen in the future. We also agree that the difference is just a matter of probability. However, we have opposite understanding on that probability.

My wife / my wife"s teacher says:

"Probably", "maybe" and "perhaps" are keywords pointing towards to use of "will".

There are no keywords for "going to", but it should be used when something is very certain to happen.

"Going to" is used in cases with low probability

"Will" is used with high probability.

The latter model fits very well to what I have learned at school. However, my wife"s teacher says that one reason for Germans to have the difficulty is that we learn it wrong at school.

When to use "will" and when to use "going to"? Is it a matter of probability? Is it a matter of stylistics (e.g. will for the single sentence examples and be going to for the multi-sentence examples as pointed out in one of the comments)? Is it a matter of how far into the future (present prediction vs. future prediction)?

Oxford dictionary

I looked up the definition of "will (modal verb)" in the Oxford advanced learners dictionary, sixth impressum and it says:

From these descriptions, my opinion is that "will" is used for higher probability (a general truth is more likely than something else, habits are more likely than non-habits). I also can't find any of the keywords in the examples given in the Oxford dictionary.

I also tried looking up "going to", but it's neither present under "going to" nor could I find it under "go".

Inlingua textbook

Second, I looked it up in my English textbook, which is Inlingua English 2 Step 1. Unit 7 is about "Planning" and there is an exercise 7.3 about decisions. While I would consider a decision and plans as something with high probability (because I can influence it), all the sentences start with "going to", which contradicts my understanding. Unfortunately the Inlingua book is quite crap, because it seldom gives definitions and bases everything on examples only.

We use "will" and "going to" to discuss forecasts that are quite certain.

English Page

Derived from "might", this sounds both suitable for improbable cases.

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