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I want to put an semicolon in his sentence, but I am not sure it is right.

Hi, SCM deployed this; it is ready for testing.

Also, could a colon be used in place of the semi-colon?

  • Please take a look at our Contributor's Guide on meta. It has some very useful tips about text formatting, question titles, question details, and shared research. – J.R. May 9 at 18:24
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Yes, a semicolon is appropriate there. That sentence is joining two independent clauses without using a conjunction. It could be rewritten as two sentences:

SCM deployed this. It is ready for testing.

or as one sentence with a conjunction:

SCM deployed this, and it is ready for testing.

When both of those are true, a semi-colon may be used.

The semi-colon stresses the independence of the two parts more than the version with and, but stresses their connection more than the version with two separate sentences.

By contrast, a colon may be used for several things, but not in the example.

A colon can be used for several purposes:

  • To introduce a list of items;
  • To introduce a quotation or a statement in direct dialog, which is or could be in quotation marks;
  • To connect a phrase that is not a complete sentence and serves as an introduction with an independent clause that could stand as a separate sentance;
  • To introduce an example.
  • Between chapter and verse in a Bible citaion;
  • Between hours and minutes when giving a tiem;
  • Between title and subtitle of a work being cited;

Some people use colons to join independent clauses that are parallel in form. I do not favor this, but in any case it does not apply to the example.

  • Why can't/shouldn't you use a colon? – GC_ May 9 at 16:34
  • @GC_ I have expanded the answer with ways in which a colon can be used. – David Siegel May 9 at 16:55

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