2

Example:

Thanks for contacting our support. I'll be happy to help you with your question.

Currently, our product does not support comment or review feature. That is why you're only seeing the ratings on your website but don't worry, there are several comment plugins that you can use for your site.

My concern is about the usage of but don't worry in this example. Should the second sentence be rewritten like this?

That is why you're only seeing the ratings on your website. But don't worry, there are several comment plugins that you can use for your site.

Aside from that, what would be the better ways to rewrite it?

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    Yes. You're correct. – Ronald Sole Nov 8 '19 at 11:09
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    It can be rewritten that way. It can also be rewritten several other ways. How it's rewritten (assuming it's changed at all) is a matter of style and personal opinion. – Jason Bassford Nov 9 '19 at 13:55
  • Thanks @JasonBassfordSupportsMonica, could you please provide an example of how it's rewritten in a better way? – user1764381 Nov 10 '19 at 0:22
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    What's better is subjective. While it's not conventionally punctuated as it's currently written, it's still not wrong. You don't have to have a comma before but, the sentence could end after worry, and what comes after that could simply be considered appositional. – Jason Bassford Nov 10 '19 at 3:11
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    That sentence is fine—although I wouldn't interpret it the way you likely intend it to be interpreted. The likely meaning would be: That is why you're only seeing the ratings on your website but [you] don't worry. – Jason Bassford Nov 10 '19 at 4:24
1

That is why you're only seeing the ratings on your website. But don't worry, there are several comment plugins that you can use for your site.

This is correct.

That is why you're only seeing the ratings on your website but don't worry, there are several comment plugins that you can use for your site.

This has exactly the same meaning, and most English speakers would not find it strange or think it sounded "wrong". But it is a "run-on" sentence; if you were in an English class your teacher would deduct a mark.

Use the first - it conveys more of a sense of professionalism and attention to language, in addition to us all having been taught it is more correct.

(You might also consider adding a "because" after "worry," and before "there" for tone, in this context.)

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