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Profits continue to grow, with strong performances in South America and the Far East.

Comma after ''grow''

He was clothed in his photo, with a friendly smile.

Comma after '' photo''

What does comma mean in these sentences ? Does meanings changes if I delete the comma in these sentences?

Bring the phone on the table .

Bring the phone , on the table here.

Bring the phone on the table here.

In first sentence I want someone to put the phone onto the table

In second sentence I want someone to bring the phone that is on the table. Or should I put comma before ''here''?

Are my opinions about comma correct ?

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The simple answer to "meaning of commas in sentences" is: they separate clauses.

Profits continue to grow, with strong performances in South America and the Far East.

Apparently profits are continuing to grow in lots of areas. The sentence then makes a separate observation that growth in two particular areas is noteworthy. This is two clauses.

If the comma were not there then it would sound like "profits continue to grow with strong performances", suggesting that the growth of profits is exclusive to strong performances.


He was clothed in his photo, with a friendly smile.

There are two clauses because there are two notable things about the photo: firstly that he is clothed, and secondly that he has a friendly smile. Again, two clauses that require separation.

Without the comma it would sound like he was "clothed with a friendly smile" - that he was "wearing" the smile (which is an idiom) and any point about him wearing clothes would be lost.


Bring the phone on the table.

Without commas this makes sense - you are asking someone to bring the phone that is on the table. "on the table" is an attribute of the phone.

Your other two examples don't make sense - the one with the comma is not grammatical, and the last one is just nonsensical - if the phone is already here you don't need someone to bring it - it is already here. I'm not sure what you mean with this example - I can't think of any situation a comma might be needed here as there appears to be just one clause.

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  • Okay got it . Does the sentence “bring the phone on the table “ also mean bring the phone to put on the table . If you say “ no” , please explain why ? – user90151 Dec 13 '19 at 13:50
  • @languagelearner No - because we would bring something to a table, not "on". "Bring" is the action of moving something closer to something else. You could say "put the phone on the table" instead. – Astralbee Dec 13 '19 at 14:04
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I would not use a comma in any of these sentences. If I explain the rules first, it will be easier for you to understand how to use a comma.

Using commas accurately:

  • To separate an introductory element.
  • To separate small items in a list.
  • To end a subordinate clause (dependent clause), but only if it comes before the independent clause.
  • (Conjunctions such as: but, or, yet, for, and, nor, so) must all have a comma before them if they separate two independent clauses otherwise no comma.
  • Use commas to encapsulate a conjunctive adverbs in mid sentence.
  • Use a semicolon, conjunctive adverb and a comma if linking two independent clauses that are connected in thought.

Examples

Introductory element

In midsummer, me and my friends went to the park almost every day.

Separating small items in a list

I need the following from the shops: milk, sugar, tea, bread and chocolate.

Note, if the items are larger and or have 'and' within the items, use semicolons to separate the items.

Here is a list of things I bought from the supermarket: milk, sugar and tea for drinks; crisps, biscuits and chocolate for snacks; fish, potatoes and veg for dinner.

To end a subordinate clause

Although it was raining hard outside, she didn't get wet.

Note that the order of the clauses matter. For instance, if i swap the order, the comma is dropped.

She didn't get wet although it was raining hard outside.

Conjunctions

I went into town, but i didn't play football in the park.

Note that the above sentence has two independent clauses. 'I went into town' can stand alone as can 'I didn't play football in the park.'

Use commas to encapsulate a conjunctive adverb

It is a really sunny day today; I must stay in, however, and finish my assignment for School.

Semicolon, conjunctive adverb and a comma

It is a really sunny day today; however, I must stay in and finish my assignment for School.

In your examples, the commas are not needed since none of the rules apply.

The following sentences are grammatically incorrect. No comma is needed here since 'with' is not a conjunction it is a preposition.

Profits continue to grow, with strong performances in South America and the Far East. (Incorrect/no comma needed)

He was clothed in his photo, with a friendly smile. (Incorrect/no comma needed)

Bring the phone on the table. This is not a complete sentence because it doesn't have a subject; thus, doesn't make sense. To correct the grammar of this sentence, add a subject.

Bring the phone on the table to me.

Or

Bring me the phone on the table.

The trick to understanding commas is to understand how to build a sentence.

Bibliography:

https://www.bristol.ac.uk/arts/exercises/grammar/grammar_tutorial/page_27.htm

https://www.bristol.ac.uk/arts/exercises/grammar/grammar_tutorial/page_06.htm

https://youtu.be/oUG6WkEwKC4?t=386

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  • The commas are worthwhile in the first two examples for the reasons given by @Astralbee. – TypeIA Dec 13 '19 at 16:05
  • @Astralbee answer is incorrect. Mine is the correct answer. Sorry. – Tony McDonald Dec 13 '19 at 16:29
  • You haven't provided any authoritative sources, and your personal assurance alone is not convincing. Other sources validate commas "before certain conjunctions." In the first example sentence, "with" qualifies as such a conjunction. – TypeIA Dec 13 '19 at 16:55
  • This answer over on the ELU sister site also directly contradicts your answer. – TypeIA Dec 13 '19 at 16:57
  • WITH is not a conjunction it is a preposition. I gave a list of conjunctions in my original answer. bristol.ac.uk/arts/exercises/grammar/grammar_tutorial/… – Tony McDonald Dec 13 '19 at 17:30

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