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What is the meaning of "what you say you will" in the following sentences?

1) When you have a solution that both of you agree on, take responsibility for doing what you say you will (Source: CAN WE GET ALONG? BY Crabtree Publishing Company)

2) 5 Reasons to do what you say you will do

Does 1)sentence mean "take responsibility for doing what you say, and take responsibility for doing what you will" ?

Does 2)sentence mean "5 Reasons to do what you say, and what you will do" ?

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    If you say "I will do X", then X is what you say [that] you will do. – Kate Bunting Jan 30 at 17:08
  • If so, does "X is what you say [that] you will do" mean " X [that] you will do is what you say" ? What does "sentences 1 and 2" mean? I can't interpret it. – user22046 Jan 30 at 18:00
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    (1) refers to two people who are going to decide how to solve a problem. Each of them will say what they intend to do about it, and then take responsibility for doing that thing. (2) 5 reasons to do the thing you say you are going to do. I don't know how to explain it any more clearly. – Kate Bunting Jan 30 at 22:18
  • Is the structure of "take responsibility for doing what you say you will" "take responsibility for doing what Subject + Verb + Subject + Verb" ? How can Subject + Verb appear twice? – user22046 Jan 31 at 0:21
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    Is the structure of "take responsibility for doing what you say you will" "take responsibility for doing what Subject + Verb + Subject + Verb" ? How can Subject + Verb appear twice? As I said in my first comment, what you say you will [do] is a phrase meaning the action you promised to take. This phrase substitutes for a noun in take responsibility for doing (what you say you will) – Kate Bunting Jan 31 at 9:43
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What you say you will is equivalent to saying "the things that you said that you would do earlier."

When you have a solution that both of you agree on, take responsibility for doing what you say you will

There's an implication that comes between these clauses that isn't expressed but understood. That implication is that "both of you" will say (or announce) the actions they are planning to take, that make up the solution.

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  • If so, does "the things that you said that you would do earlier." mean "the things [that you would do earlier] that you said"? – user22046 Jan 30 at 18:03

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