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I wrote this sentence below in an essay and my teacher corrected me from:

“I agree with this statement because more and more women go to college like men, having sometimes an even better academic performance from their male peers”

To

“I agree with this statement because more and more women go to college like me, and sometimes they have an even better academic performance from their male peers”

But I don’t get it. Why I cannot use gerund in that case?

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Using "having" is a little difficult to interpret here. Your teacher has interpreted it differently from me - I read it as "... like men, because they sometimes have ...". Your teacher's suggestion is easier to understand, and that is a good thing.

Also your teacher missed the word "from" before "their male peers". This should be "than" (better than, not better from).

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  • Thank you so much for your help. So should I use gerunds only after independent clauses?
    – newdmk
    Nov 17, 2020 at 12:21
  • I don't think that's relevant here. If you dropped "I agree with this statement because" you have satisfied that condition, but the ambiguity remains. For me the issue is not the rule, but saying exactly what you mean. This takes practice!
    – Peter
    Nov 18, 2020 at 11:41

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