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Is the bold part of the sentence correct or shall I use "of structure" as in the second example.

The current study attempts to bridge this gap in ethical misconduct research and address the lack of thorough exploration of perceived ethical factors’ effects on TSR.

or

The current study attempts to bridge this gap in ethical misconduct research and address the lack of thorough exploration of the effects of the perceived ethical factors’ on TSR.

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A possessive can be indicated with an apostrophe or with an "of." Using both is redundant; your first example is correct and your second example is not (though it would be if you removed the apostrophe). I would lean towards using the "of" instead of the apostrophe in this case, but that is a stylistic matter.

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    Using both isn't always redundant, or at least not wrong, like a native English speaker would say, "He's a friend of John's," or, "He's a friend of mine," never, "He's a friend of John," or, "He's a friend of me." Instances of "of" followed by a possessive are called double possessives, are not ungrammatical, and are useful, like if I say, "This is John's picture," you don't know if the picture belongs to John or if John is its subject, but if I say, "This is a picture of John," you know John is its subject, whereas if I say, "This is a picture of John's," you know it belongs to John. Jun 26 at 18:33

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