1

as regards = concerning; in respect of

2. regard [with object] {archaic} = (Of a thing) relate to; concern

ES [= Example Sentence]: The condition of the University, as regards its finances, is explained by the acc[oun]ts. of the Bursar & Proctor, also communicated.

As per the above, because regard = concern, this question also applies to 'as concerns'.

I wish to delve into the definition, which I already understand and so ask NOT about. Something feels missing in as regards ? I am guessing that as operates as a conjunction here, and regard a (conjugated verb), but is a subject or object missing?

In the ES above, the direct object seems to be 'its finances'. But what's the subject?

  • This is not the concern definition. This is "relate to"... As this relates to farro, flaxseeds can.... – Catija Mar 21 '15 at 2:43
  • Can you post a link to the actual example sentence? I don't see that sentence anywhere on the link you posted... also, if you're just trying to define what farro is, you'd be better served with a wikipedia link... that one is particularly un-useful. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Farro – Catija Mar 21 '15 at 2:45
  • @Catija Thanks for your comment. I actually contrived that example sentence. Should I find another? I'll update my OP with the Wikipedia link later; I learned about all these healthy foods from that Time website. – Accounting Mar 21 '15 at 2:48
  • You should find an example sentence in a real document... I'm not sure your example itself makes sense, which is what the problem could be... I mean, clearly I can guess at what it means but that's sort of the wonder of English. – Catija Mar 21 '15 at 2:54
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    Your example sounds like Jabberwocky; this is not a good example when talking semantics. – cpast Mar 21 '15 at 3:37
2

As regards is a prepositional phrase, similar to in between or in the middle of.

I've heard the term with regard(s) to and as regards to/with on occasion. That and I can see where regards almost sounds/looks like a verb. The to on the end is not always needed.

Regards in as regards is, I believe, technically a plural noun that is part of a prepositional phrase.

The condition of the University, as regards its finances, is explained by the acc[oun]ts. of the Bursar & Proctor, also communicated.

The subject of this sentence is The condition of the University and the verb is is explained.

Condition is the main, single-word subject - and condition is qualified/modified by of the university, and the entire phrase condition of the university is further qualified/modified by as regards its finances.

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0

I would not try to break "as regards" into pieces; the syntax is archaic but the fixed expression has remained. It can safely be replaced by regarding or with regard to and is a synonym for concerning.

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  • Sorry, but how does this answer my question? I declared that I wish to delve into the definition, which I already understand and so ask NOT about. So I don't want to replace it. – Accounting Apr 20 '15 at 18:33
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    The question is "How to dissect or parse 'as regards'?" The answer is, "don't." If you are curious about the etymology of the phrase or its original grammatical function, the question should go to linguistics.stackexchange.com or english.stackexchange.com – hunter Apr 20 '15 at 18:38
  • Should your answer be a comment then? It doesn't directly answer my question. – Accounting Jun 10 '15 at 22:26

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