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I've made the following sentence:

I prefer doing things alone to with someone else.

Is that sentence correct? I also tried to replace that someone else with big company as follows:

I prefer doing things alone to in a big company of people.

I tried to say that If I had a choice to join to a group of people and do the things with them I wouldn't do that and do the things myself.

Is it correct ot say so?

  • @Catija It was mispelling in the title. Yes, I'm sure. – Dmitrii Bundin Jul 21 '15 at 19:30
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You're using the construction

I prefer ... to ...

but the two clauses in the middle both need a similar construction (in this case, they both need a verb). In order to make the sentence correct, you would need to add a verb to the second clause:

I prefer doing things alone to doing them with someone else.

It's a little more wordy, but conveys the meaning much better and more correctly.

  • What about the big comapny? – Dmitrii Bundin Jul 21 '15 at 19:31
  • It would be exactly the same: "I prefer doing things alone to doing them in a big company of people." (Although "a big group" might be a little more colloquial than "a big company"). – GentlePurpleRain Jul 21 '15 at 19:32
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I prefer doing things alone to with somebody else.

The sentence doesn't sound natural; you can rephrase it as follows:

I prefer doing things alone to doing (them) with somebody else. Alternatively, it will sound more easy on the ear if you say:

I prefer doing things alone rather than with somebody else. Please look up the word prefer under translations - The Free Dictionary.

Moreover, in informal English, you can say:

I do things alone rather than with somebody else.

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