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I am not sure whether the word "and" needs in the following sentence I created:

I studied all the time after my mother returned home (and) until my father returned home.

Could anyone give me advice !

  • The time between my mother and my father getting home I spent studying. – Edwin Ashworth Dec 17 '16 at 17:03
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It's stilted. You're describing an interval of time - use from/to or from/until. After/until is not a normal pairing.

I studied from the time my mother returned home until my father returned home.

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No, it's not needed. Using "and" in the sentence makes it sound incomplete; as if another action was expected. For instance, "I studied all the time after my mother returned home and until my father returned home, I coudn't stop."

  • Hard to say. You have a point that the and could create a garden path to another independent clause (although not using a comma should help). On the other hand, readers may expect an adverbial of time (until) to apply to the mother's return instead of the child's study. – deadrat Dec 17 '16 at 22:19
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I would write it like this.

In the time after my mother and until my father returned home I would study.

There is no need to repeat "returned home" twice, I think that is the mistake not the "and".

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