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Are these sentences grammatically correct?

  1. Did you know that he has cheated on you?

  2. Do you know that he always has been telling you to stop making a joke?

I guess I am quite a bit confused when it comes to do/did question sentences, whether I can follow it up with present perfect/past perfect tense.

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    Both sentences are grammatical, although the second is a little awkward. It isn't clear what concerns you here. Were you taught that a Do question can't be followed by a use of the perfect? – P. E. Dant Jun 27 '17 at 3:08
  • it has been a while since I decided to learn english again, I don't think I have been taught about that I am just making sure cause my memory is a little bit hazy. My next question is that why do you think the second question was kinda awkward? also, can I use past tense / past perfect tense after "Do you know" ? – johnsmith44 Jun 27 '17 at 3:38
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    A native speaker would never use the construction "Did you know that he always has been…" We would not place the adverb between the subject and verb of such a clause. We would say not "Did you know that he always has been telling..." but rather "Did you know that he kept telling..." – P. E. Dant Jun 27 '17 at 4:56
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    Yes, you may use any time perspective you prefer after "Do you know." For example, "Do you know that the warp drive was to have been disabled sfter 12.6 quintillion parsecs of duty?" – P. E. Dant Jun 27 '17 at 5:09
  • @P. E. Dant The present perfect simple expresses an action that is still going on or that stopped recently, but has an influence on the present. How can it fit with "past simple "? Isn't it two different time frame? I think "Did you know that he has cheated on you? " can only fit if he has continued cheating upto present . Can you explain please? – dz420 Jun 27 '17 at 5:57
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Both of your sentences are correct and understandable.

Your second sentence

Do you know that he always has been telling you to stop making a joke?

might be reworded as

Do you know that he has always been telling you to stop making a joke?

and the phrase

to stop making a joke

sounds incomplete, it could be

to stop making a joke about (something)

or you might mean

to stop joking around

which is an idiom.

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