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I'm taking an online course about conflict resolution and in one slide they show both forms.

First, there's this part where they show this web site: www.resolutionofconflict.com.au (it's unavailable now, maybe the course is really old). And then there's this image stating "Resolution of Conflict":

enter image description here

Then, after some seconds, they show this banner below stating "Conflict Resolution":

enter image description here

So, what's the proper way to state this phrase? I only knew that it should be the latter.

Also, is there any grammar rule to use for these cases?

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  • Sometimes, there might be a stylistic reason for using resolution of conflicts but as a subject area thing, there is not. – Lambie Feb 6 at 19:49
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Either way works. While many other languages would prefer "Resolution of Conflict", in English, you can use "Conflict Resolution" as well. In this case, "conflict" is used as an adjective. You can do this in many other cases as well. If you aren't sure which is right, and it involves two nouns such as "conflict" and "resolution", then I'd stick with the [noun] of [noun] form. Most English speakers will have their own personal preference but there is no "universal preference" by English speakers as a whole. I hope this helps!

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  • Other languages don't use nouns as adjectives and Spanish and French would have to use of (de). – Lambie Feb 6 at 19:48

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