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I am confused about the word furthermore in the middle of the sentence. Can I use it like this?

However currently both systems are functioning, furthermore, for different issues.

It is put in the middle of the sentence without any additional verb. Is it right? And does it make sense?

Also are the words furthermore and moreover interchangeable?

  • You are confused about, not confusing. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Jan 8 at 14:12
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Although furthermore can be used as you do in your sentence, it usually introduces a new clause, appearing at the head of the clause. You will find moreover far more often in your pattern.

On a separate issue, the phrase functioning for different issues while grammatical, is not quite idiomatic. The usual phrase is addressing different issues.

The word both is wrong (unless there's a third issue in the context).

both systems are addressing different issues.

You'd want to say each;

... each system is addressing a different issue.

And you don't want to combine However and furthermore in the same clause.

  • Then how can I rephrase this sentence so it wouldn't miss any piece of my message? "However currently both systems are functioning, moreover, each is addressing a different issue". Does it make sense? – Gamilato Jan 8 at 14:54
  • @Gamilato: I don't know what it is you are trying to say since you begin in the middle of the thought. What came before "However"? – Tᴚoɯɐuo Jan 8 at 14:56
  • Ah the context is that the new office system is being implemented, while the previous one is still available, so they both are operational. So they now have different working purposes. And I need to say that super shortly, that is why I put so many in that sentence. – Gamilato Jan 8 at 15:06
  • I am still not clear on what you want to say. Is it something like this: Although the new system has been brought online, the old system is still available for a variety of reasons. Is that what you mean to say by "for different reasons"? – Tᴚoɯɐuo Jan 8 at 15:35
  • I said "different issues", because there are issues in that systems that employees work on. So it is slightly different. But anyway thank you for your answer, it helped! – Gamilato Jan 8 at 15:39

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