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Is the use of the term "is close" formal enough to deal with the similarity between two concepts?

"The term A is close to the concept of the term B".

I need to say that two concepts are very close, but without to use the term "similar" or "analogous" or "comparable".

I would do this because such terms sound more formal than I guess that will be good for an academic issue. I'm a beginner in English, maybe I'm wrong.

Thank you.

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    What would you say if I suggested you write something like this: Term A in concept is close to term B. The adverbial in concept tells the reader in what manner the term A is close to the term B. – Michael Rybkin Nov 14 '18 at 21:09
  • All of the words you cite mean essentially the same thing. I have no idea what you mean by "formal enough," or why you think the other words won't work. Any of them are fine, including the phrase close to. – Jason Bassford Supports Monica Nov 14 '18 at 21:11
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What would you say if I suggested that you rewrite your sentence like this:

Term A in concept is close to term B.

The adverbial expression in concept tells the reader in what manner term A is close to term B—term A is similar to term B conceptually or on the conceptual level.

  • Why in concept and not conceptually? – Juhasz Nov 14 '18 at 22:29
  • You could certainly say conceptually. In concept was the thing thing that sprang to mind. – Michael Rybkin Nov 14 '18 at 22:33

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