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I've come across with the sentence below:

Old tasks become easier the second time around, but it doesn’t get easier overall because now you’re pouring your energy into the next challenge.

I know that: "The word get and become are sometimes interchangeable" "Both ... can be followed by adjectives. In this case, they both indicate growth or development of some sort."[1]

But I'm not sure the author uses them interchangeably or differently.

So, Could you please tell me if there is any differences between them in meaning here?

The full text is:

Usually, this minor dip in performance is no cause for worry. [...] The less energy you spend on trivial choices, the more you can spend it on what really matters. However, when you want to maximize your potential and achieve elite levels of performance, you need a more nuanced approach. You can’t repeat the same things blindly and expect to become exceptional. Habits are necessary, but not sufficient for mastery. What you need is a combination of automatic habits and deliberate practice. Habits + Deliberate Practice = Mastery To become great, certain skills do need to become automatic. Basketball players need to be able to dribble without thinking before they can move on to mastering layups with their nondominant hand. [...] But after one habit has been mastered, you have to return to the effortful part of the work and begin building the next habit. Mastery is the process of narrowing your focus to a tiny element of success, repeating it until you have internalized the skill, and then using this new habit as the foundation to advance to the next frontier of your development. Old tasks become easier the second time around, but it doesn’t get easier overall because now you’re pouring your energy into the next challenge. Each habit unlocks the next level of performance. It’s an endless cycle.

Atomic habits by James Clear

[1]https://www.englishgrammar.org/get-and-become/

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"Get" and "become" are equivalent in this example, and both are acceptable. ("Get" is a little less formal and more direct than "become".) The use of both terms adds some variety to the sentence.

As a side note, I suggest that the author really means "Tasks are easier the second time around." or "Tasks become easier with repetition." I don't think they mean to imply that tasks stay at exactly the same level of difficulty the first time they are performed but become easier in the process of performing them a second time. The meaning is clear, but a little editing would tighten up that sentence, including the lone "it" (the tasks? the process? life?).

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