1

I was wondering if you could let me know in each one of the following sets, which sentence sounds idiomatic and then natural. If a sentence doesn't work, how I should write it. (From my point of view, all of the sentences in each group mean exactly the same.)

A)

I didn't mean to take liberty.
I didn't mean to take liberties.
I didn't mean to venture.

B)

I took the liberty of using your umbrella when you were absent. I hope you don’t mind.
I took the liberties of using your umbrella when you were absent. I hope you don’t mind.
I ventured and used your umbrella when you were absent. I hope you don’t mind.

2

For A: "I didn't mean to take the liberty." The assumption is the listener knows what you're referring to.

For B: "I took the liberty of using your umbrella when/while you were absent."

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  • thanks a zillion for being of help. But supposing an event has not happened and you as a way to show your politeness, want to take permission from someone to do something, (for instance taking their umbrella), then could you please let me know if it's possible to say the following sentence: - May I take the liberty and use your umbrella? – A-friend Apr 17 '14 at 4:35
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    "While you're away, may I take the liberty of using your umbrella?" – Johns-305 Apr 17 '14 at 6:29
  • Therefor it is possible to tell somebody: "May I take the liberty of asking you a question?" Thank you very much @boatseller. It was a great help. ;) – A-friend Apr 17 '14 at 6:36

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